U.S. Capitol | KUNR

U.S. Capitol

A peaceful picture of the U.S. Capitol sits under a bright, clear, blue sky.
Matt Wade / Wikipedia Creative Commons

It's been a tumultuous week in the nation's capital as lawmakers contend with the insurrection and subsequent impeachment of President Donald Trump. KUNR Morning Edition Host Noah Glick checks in with Political Editor Paul Boger to get a sense of where Nevada's lawmakers stand.

Kristen McNeill sits on the right next to WCSD Board President Angie Taylor behind a folding table with a black table cloth. Both are looking down as McNeill reads prepared remarks.
Paul Boger / KUNR

Washoe County School Superintendent Kristen McNeill says a robocall meant to support families after last week’s attack on the U.S. Capitol may have been better sent in a letter. But McNeill stands by her message despite some criticism.

As the violent mob broke into the U.S. Capitol last Wednesday, and livestreams showed pro-Trump insurrectionists defacing property and posing in the House Speaker's chair, here in the West, feelings of shock quickly faded to familiarity.

"There are years of warning signs," said Eric Ward of the Western States Center, which tracks extremism in Oregon and the West.

Updated 5:45 p.m. ET

With nine days left before President Trump's term comes to an end, the House of Representatives is forging ahead with plans to try to remove the president from office over his role in his supporters' violent attack last week on the U.S. Capitol.


Last summer, I met up with Ben Barto outside the small town of Dubois, Wyo. He's a huge Trump supporter and we were having a conversation about where he thought America was headed. 

"Revolution," he said. "I think it's headed there."

Updated Saturday at 10:14 a.m. ET

Virginia Republican gubernatorial candidate and state Sen. Amanda Chase is facing calls to resign after attending the pro-Trump rally in Washington, D.C., on Wednesday. Chase addressed a crowd at the event but said she departed "just in time" before a mob began to riot and force its way into the U.S. Capitol.

There are a lot of questions about why the pro-Trump mob was able to breach the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday. One pertains to the National Guard: Where were they?


Updated at 3:54 p.m. ET

President-elect Joe Biden delivered a blistering rebuke of President Trump on Thursday, a day after a pro-Trump mob breached the U.S. Capitol.

Biden called Wednesday "one of the darkest days" in U.S. history but said: "I wish we could say we couldn't see it coming. But that isn't true. We could see it coming."

Updated Friday at 12:05 a.m. ET

U.S. Capitol Police announced late Thursday that an officer hurt during this week's violent assault on the chambers of Congress by protesters loyal to President Trump has died from his injuries.

"At approximately 9:30 p.m. this evening (January 7, 2021), United States Capitol Police Officer Brian D. Sicknick passed away due to injuries sustained while on-duty," a statement from the U.S. Capitol Police said.

A tweet by Republican Representative Mark Amodei that reads, “January 6, 2021: History made today for all the wrong reasons. Shameful. All our Washington staff are safe.”
RepMarkAmodei Via Twitter

Update Thursday, Jan. 7, 8:48 a.m. PT

Nevada lawmakers continue to comment on the armed insurgency of the U.S. Capitol.

U.S. Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto tweeted an update yesterday about the importance of finishing the Electoral College tally.

Updated at 4:22 p.m. ET

President-elect Joe Biden called the violent protests that engulfed the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday an "assault on the most sacred of American undertakings: the doing of the people's business" and called on President Trump to immediately demand that his supporters stop the violence.

In a somber address, Biden called on Trump, who had not publicly spoken since a rally earlier Wednesday, to "go on national television now to fulfill his oath and defend the Constitution and demand an end to this siege."

Updated at 11:45 p.m. ET

Congress reconvened Wednesday night to certify President-elect Joe Biden's Electoral College victory, just hours after the U.S. Capitol was thrust into chaos by supporters of President Trump — an angry mob that breached the complex in an unprecedented violent act at the seat of America's federal government.

Updated at 6:38 p.m. ET

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi informed House lawmakers that Congress will reconvene Wednesday night to continue its constitutional duty to count and certify the electoral votes after pro-Trump protestors breached the Capitol and forced Capitol Police to evacuate both the House and Senate.