US Supreme Court

Updated at 6:35 p.m. ET

In a major rebuke to President Trump, the U.S. Supreme Court has blocked the administration's plan to dismantle an Obama-era program that has protected 700,000 so-called DREAMers from deportation. The vote was 5-4, with Chief Justice John Roberts writing the opinion.

A blank DACA immigration form.
Natalie Van Hoozer / KUNR Public Radio

The Supreme Court will decide whether or not to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, also known as DACA, as early as Thursday. DACA is a United States immigration policy that grants undocumented children brought to the U.S. at a young age a renewable two-year permit that protects them from deportation and grants them the opportunity to work legally. KUNR’s Stephanie Serrano spoke with Michael Shamoon, an attorney with UNLV’s immigration clinic, about the future of this program.

This week's Supreme Court ruling shielding LGBTQ employees from discrimination effectively evens out a patchwork of protections in the Mountain West.


Updated at 5:52 p.m.

In a historic decision, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday that the 1964 Civil Rights Act protects gay, lesbian, and transgender employees from discrimination based on sex. The ruling was 6-3, with Justice Neil Gorsuch, President Trump's first appointee to the court, writing the majority opinion. The opinion was joined by Chief Justice John Roberts and the court's four liberal justices.

Amid the tumult over police brutality allegations across the country, the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday refused to reexamine the much-criticized, modern-day legal doctrine created by judges that has shielded police and other government officials from lawsuits over their conduct.

In an unsigned order, the court declined to hear cases seeking reexamination of the doctrine of "qualified immunity." Justice Clarence Thomas dissented, saying the "qualified immunity doctrine appears to stray from the statutory text."

It takes the votes of four justices to grant review of a case.

The U.S. Supreme Court seemed pulled in two directions Wednesday—between the original meaning of the Constitution, on the one hand, and chaos in the 2020 election on the other.

The election will take place amid a pandemic, at least a partial economic collapse, and potentially a Supreme Court ruling that could directly affect the election itself.

Updated on Wednesday, May 13, at 3:45 p.m. ET

Amid the coronavirus pandemic, the Supreme Court has over two weeks heard oral arguments remotely, with audio streaming live for the public — a first for the court.

The arguments included high-profile cases about religious freedom, President Trump's financial records and the Electoral College.

For each case, both sides had the same amount of time, beginning with two minutes of uninterrupted argument. Then, each justice was allotted two minutes for questioning.

Heller Predicts Upcoming High Court Vacancy

Mar 9, 2018
Public Domain

New comments from Senator Dean Heller seem to imply the U.S. Supreme Court could have a vacancy as soon as this summer.

In a Q and A with the J. Reuben Clark Law Society in Las Vegas last week, Heller made a number of bold claims. Among them, a prediction that Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy will retire by early summer.

"That being the case, the Republicans are going to have an opportunity to put another supreme court justice in place, which I'm hoping will get our base motivated because right now they're not motivated."