wildfire

A fire and smoke on the side of a mountain.
Image from ALERTWildfire Greater Tahoe cameras on Twitter @nvfirecams

11:41 a.m. | July 10, 2020

Growth tapered off overnight on Thursday for the Numbers Fire, burning near Gardnerville, according to Douglas County officials.

“Existing containment lines held despite gusty winds,” officials said in a press release Friday. Winds are expected to decrease on Friday, with hot temperatures.

The county cautioned drivers to be aware of increased fire traffic in the areas around the Douglas County Fairgrounds, as crews are working out of a firecamp on the grounds. They said drivers should also limit the use of Pinenut 2 and Blossom Canyon Roads; they are only open to residents.

Fire burns at dusk on a foothill
Luke Flynt / Unsplash

Reno saw one of its first major wildfire events of the dry season this past weekend with the Poeville Fire. And with the pandemic going on, agencies across the West are having to rethink how to fight fires while fighting the novel coronavirus.

Smoke casts a shadow on a sunset behind a stadium
Bree Zender / KUNR

KUNR is providing updates on the Poeville Fire. Click here for more information. For the most current information about the Poeville Fire, visit @TMPFD and @HumboldtToiyabe on Twitter.

Hundreds evacuated from neighborhoods north of Reno Saturday as the Poeville Fire burned multiple structures. 

Truckee Meadows Fire Protection District officials said on Sunday morning the fire had charred approximately 3,500 acres. As of Sunday morning, firefighters had built containment lines around 10 percent of the burn area. More high wind gusts and dry conditions are expected through late Sunday.

Many parts of the Mountain West are predicted to have above normal wildfire potential this summer. The coronavirus promises to make fire season abnormal in other ways, too.

An image of a firefighter fighting a wildfire
Colorado's West Metro Fire Protection District

As the pandemic decimates local budgets across the Mountain West, another threat looms large at local fire stations across the region: wildfires. That has lawmakers and firefighters demanding more federal support.

An image of a firefighter standing outside of a truck, spraying water, and wearing a facemask.
Bureau of Land Management

How are wildland firefighters expected to battle blazes during a pandemic? That's not entirely clear, but a bipartisan bill proposed by Mountain West lawmakers aims to help ensure firefighters' safety.

As the U.S. Forest Service prepares for the wildfire season, it must also confront COVID-19.

Already the agency's put a stop to prescribed burning. And it says it will continue fire suppression and other activities with guidance from the CDC.

The U.S. Forest Service is rethinking how it employs firefighters.

An image showing plumes of smoke billowing across the Mountain West.
NOAA

About one-third of Americans live in areas that regularly have unhealthy levels of air pollution, according to a new analysis out this week from Environment America, an organization of state-based environmental advocacy groups throughout the country.

Researchers from a number of states, including Idaho, Colorado and Nevada, have found that grazing does not help get rid of cheatgrass, a highly flammable weed. 

Bree Zender / KUNR Public Radio

With this past winter storm, prescribed burn season is ramping up in Northern Nevada and throughout the Sierra. 

Senators from Colorado and Nevada are among those sponsoring a bill aimed at reducing firefighters’ exposure to potentially harmful chemicals. 

Earlier this month the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee unanimously approved the bill, which aims to protect firefighters from being exposed to a group of chemicals known as PFAS that are found in firefighting foams and gear.

Wildfire smoke crosses the U.S. on jetstream
NASA

For much of the last decade, air pollution was decreasing. But it’s now on the rise, particularly in the West.

That’s according to a recent study by the National Bureau of Economic Research. It found that between 2016 and 2018, the levels of fine particulate matter increased 11.5% in the West. California's been impacted the most.

Bree Zender / KUNR Public Radio

Researchers say forest fires are typically good for rebooting the health of forests, but a new study published in the journal Ecosphere says that high-intensity wildfires are dramatically changing the plant habitat structure of forests in the Sierra Nevada. 

A new study suggests huge fire blankets can help protect homes during wildfires.

Our region is leading the way on training helicopter pilots to fight fires at night.  There are costs and hazards involved but the move could also help firefighters get the most threatening blazes under control more quickly.

Taboose Fire Outside Bishop: What We Know

Sep 9, 2019
US Forest Service - Inyo National Forest

Editor's Note: As of 09/12/19, KUNR has stopped actively updating this web post. The U.S. Forest Service-Inyo National Forest is providing regular updates on Facebook.

 

09/11/2019 10:45 PM

 

The Taboose Fire is nearly 9,400 acres and is 47 percent contained. An evacuation order remains in place for Baxter Ranch, and evacuation advisories are still active for Aberdeen and Birch Creek. 

09/10/2019 5:05 PM:

#HungryFire: 100% Contained

Sep 9, 2019
Truckee Meadows Fire Protection District via Twitter

09/11/2019 10:45 PM:

The Hungry Fire in Spanish Springs is fully contained at 305 acres, according to the Bureau of Land Management. 

09/10/2019 5:05 PM:

The Nevada Bureau of Land Management is reporting the Hungry Fire, burning near Spanish Springs, has burned 300 acres and is at 30% containment.  Both ground crews and air support fought the fire Tuesday afternoon.

 

09/10/2019 12:30 PM:

Bree Zender

Note: Fire officials say mandatory evacuations for Milford area have been lifted, but area residents should be prepared to evacuate if needed. Other mandatory evacuation orders remain intact.

The Walker Fire continues to burn south of Susanville.

It’s charred nearly 44,000 acres and has been 7 percent contained, making it the biggest wildfire in California so far this year.

KUNR’s Bree Zender visited some of those who have been displaced by the evacuation orders to find out how they are adjusting. 

InciWeb

Editor's note: As of 9/13/2019, KUNR has stopped actively updating this web post. The U.S. Forest Service-Plumas National Forest is providing regular updates on Facebook.

09/12/2019 at 10:00 PM:

The burn area for the Walker Fire has grown to 49,272 acres, with 32 percent containment.

09/11/2019 at 10:45 PM:

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