wildfire

A landscape with hills and smoke filling the sky.
Bureau of Land Management California via Twitter

This blog included earlier updates from the Pinehaven Fire near Caughlin Ranch in Reno, Nev., from Tuesday, Nov. 17. For continued updates related to this fire, please visit our live blog.

A landscape with trees, hills and houses with smoke filling the air.
Jon Humbert

Editor's Note: As of Saturday, Nov. 21, KUNR is no longer actively updating this blog. For the most current information about the Pinehaven Fire, visit @RenoFireDept and @RenoPolice on Twitter or the City of Reno's website.

Bulldozer helps with firing operation
Inciweb

Scientists say the size and intensity of wildfires that we’re seeing today is alarming because it’s what they were predicting would happen 30 years down the road – not right now. 

An ominous smoke cloud fills the sky in Wyoming
Greg Sanders / InciWeb

Drought, wildfire and record-breaking heat are all part of the current climate landscape in the Mountain West. 

It’s a triple whammy that’s expected to continue into the coming months. 

Firefighters have long studied how fires behave to figure out where they’re going and how to keep people safe. But wildfires are becoming more unpredictable.


The Baccarat Fire burns north of Reno.
Truckee Meadows Fire Protection District via Twitter

As of 11:25 a.m. on October 6, 2020, KUNR is no longer actively updating this page. For the latest updates on this fire, check the Truckee Meadows Fire & Rescue Twitter page.

11:25 a.m. | October 6, 2020

The Baccarat Fire north of Reno is 40 percent contained with an acreage of 10,500, according to Truckee Meadows Fire & Rescue.

A bipartisan group of Western lawmakers have signed onto a new federal bill that aims to reduce the damages of wildfire.


Large numbers of migratory birds have reportedly dropped dead in New Mexico and Colorado.

There’s still confusion over the deaths, like how many died and what exactly killed them. However, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service believes the bird deaths in Colorado and New Mexico were caused by an unusual cold front.


InciWeb

A new study suggests smoke from wildfires is more dangerous than other air pollutants for asthma patients. 

The Mountain West has seen plenty of wildfires this year, but nothing like the catastrophic large fires still burning along the West Coast. That's largely thanks to a relatively wet spring.

Truckee Meadows Fire and Rescue Truck
Scott King

This story was originally published to the Mick Hitchcock, Ph.D., Project for Visualizing Science's website on August 22, 2020.

California is blazing with three of the largest wildfires in the state’s history, with much of the state facing smoke-filled skies and evacuation orders. In just seven days, the fires have charred nearly a million acres, according to Cal Fire, which is more than triple the area burned during a typical fire season (a little over 300,000 acres). In the Tahoe region and the Great Basin, firefighters are already exhausted as they gear up for more potential fires during a dry fall.

Skies are hazy across the region thanks to the many wildfires burning in the West, and that smoke is more dangerous during the pandemic. 

Bureau of Land Management Nevada / Twitter

As of 9:15 a.m. on Saturday, Aug. 22, 2020, KUNR is no longer actively updating this web post. For the latest updates on the Loyalton Fire, follow #LoyaltonFire, @TMFPD or @Tahoe_NF on Twitter or visit the InciWeb Incident Overview

Update: Saturday, Aug. 22, 2020 at 9:14 am

The Loyalton Fire has consumed just more than 47,000 acres and is 75 percent contained. All evacuations related to this fire have been lifted and there are no road closures due to this fire.

A tornado swirling inside of a wildfire.
Courtesy of Tasha Farrell

No, it's not a sci-fi movie. A fire tornado touched down near the Nevada-California border Saturday, during the Loyalton Fire about 25 miles west of Reno, Nev.

Smoke billowing near U.S. 395 near Hallelujah Junction.
Truckee Meadows Fire Protection District via Twitter

As of 4:10 p.m. on August 6, 2020, KUNR is no longer actively updating this post. For the latest updates on this fire, follow the Truckee Meadows Fire Protection District on Twitter @TMFPD or search Twitter for #NorthFire.

4:08 p.m. | Aug. 6, 2020

The North Fire near Hallelujah Junction is 70 percent contained according to the Bureau of Land Management and has consumed more than 6,800 acres. Crews are continuing to put out any remaining hot spots and patrolling the area, according to InciWeb.

Rock Farm Fire In South Reno Now Under Control

Jul 21, 2020
An image looking at the smoke from the Rockfarm Fire in south Reno
Natalie Van Hoozer / KUNR Public Radio

As of July 22, 2020, KUNR is no longer actively updating this page. 

TMFPD Fire Chief Charles Moore said in a press conference that the Rock Farm Fire in South Reno is now under control,  but that is subject to wind conditions.

A fire and smoke on the side of a mountain.
Image from ALERTWildfire Greater Tahoe cameras on Twitter @nvfirecams

As of 5:01 p.m. on July 13, 2020, KUNR is no longer actively updating this blog.

5:00 p.m. | July 13, 2020

Investigators have determined the cause of the Numbers Fire, burning south of Gardnerville.

This story was powered by America Amplified, a public radio initiative.

Lots of wildfire smoke in the summer can lead to more flu outbreaks in the winter, according to a recent study published in the peer-reviewed journal Environment International

Fire burns at dusk on a foothill
Luke Flynt / Unsplash

Reno saw one of its first major wildfire events of the dry season this past weekend with the Poeville Fire. And with the pandemic going on, agencies across the West are having to rethink how to fight fires while fighting the novel coronavirus.

Smoke casts a shadow on a sunset behind a stadium
Bree Zender / KUNR

KUNR is providing updates on the Poeville Fire. Click here for more information. For the most current information about the Poeville Fire, visit @TMPFD and @HumboldtToiyabe on Twitter.

Hundreds evacuated from neighborhoods north of Reno Saturday as the Poeville Fire burned multiple structures. 

Truckee Meadows Fire Protection District officials said on Sunday morning the fire had charred approximately 3,500 acres. As of Sunday morning, firefighters had built containment lines around 10 percent of the burn area. More high wind gusts and dry conditions are expected through late Sunday.

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