NAACP

A black and white photo of a man sitting at a desk turned to his left, shaking the hand of a man standing. Seven other people stand behind the two men shaking hands, all formally dressed.
Courtesy of Special Collections Department, University of Nevada, Reno

The federal Civil Rights Act passed in 1964, but for years before that, activists across the country were campaigning for equal rights in their own communities. Historian Alicia Barber takes us back to one important Reno campaign in this episode of “Time & Place.”

Marcus Lavergne

Protestors took to the streets of Reno on Friday to express frustration, sadness and disbelief over recent police shootings that have shocked the country. Local activists hope the Black Lives Matter march is just the beginning of a conversation on issues of race and policing in the community.

Holding hand-painted signs and large banners, protestors peacefully marched down Virginia Street from the Reno Arch to City Hall chanting, clapping and filming with their smartphones. 

The head of a northern Nevada civil rights group says the incoming state Legislature should legalize marijuana for recreational use instead of leaving the question up to voters in November 2016.

In September, Jeffrey Blanck, president of the Reno/Sparks chapter of the NAACP, sent a letter to legislators that highlighted an ACLU study finding blacks are more likely than whites to face arrest and prosecution for marijuana possession.

The recent police shooting death of Michael Brown, an unarmed black teenager in Ferguson, Missouri, has sparked demonstrations nationwide.

In light of that situation, the Reno Police Department is stepping up their efforts to reach out to businesses and residents to build stronger community relationships, but the Reno-Sparks NAACP says that’s not enough.

Several officers are gathered at a bakery in South Reno, but they’re not investigating a crime.