vaccines | KUNR

vaccines

People of color still lack the resources they need to make informed decisions about getting vaccinated against COVID-19, according to a recent poll by the Kaiser Family Foundation.

Inside Eastridge Shopping Mall in Casper, Wyoming was once a Macy's. And signs of that department store life remain — a lot of mirrors, the old beauty department counter, and what used to be changing rooms to try on the latest fashions. Now, this building is a well-oiled, pandemic-fighting machine, with no customers.


The White House recently announced that it would not create a federal “vaccine passport” requirement, or proof that you’ve gotten the COVID-19 vaccine. Even so, leaders in Montana, Wyoming, Idaho and Utah have rejected such requirements, using everything from denunciations to executive orders to planned legislation.


This is the second in a two-part series about the vaccine rollout in Indian Country. Part one looks at the success of the rollout on rural reservations.

 

 

This is the first in a two-part series about the vaccine rollout in Indian Country. Part two looks at the challenges of vaccinating our region's urban Native population. 

 

As health officials battle vaccine hesitancy and a reluctance to follow safety guidelines, they could turn to employers for help. 


Preliminary results from a late-stage study examining the efficacy of the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine indicate it is significantly effective at preventing severe illness from COVID-19.

Diane Huntress, 74, lives in Denver and says trying to get a COVID shot for her and her husband David is like applying for a job.

“I can't talk to anyone," she said. "There's no phone number and all the emails we get say, ‘Do not reply.’ And the problem is, where can I go, can I get there, and when are they going to have it?”

She says vaccines take up all the oxygen among her social circle, too: "I can't see anybody, an acquaintance on Zoom without the question, ‘Have you gotten the vaccine yet?’”

Un volante digital. Información sobre las vacunas contra la COVID-19. Una transmisión en vivo de una charla en español el miércoles, 10 de febrero a las 5 p.m. hora del Pacífico.
KUNR

Read in English.

Con la evolución rápida de las vacunas contra la COVID-19, la emisora de radio pública KUNR, en asociación con Noticiero Móvil, organizó una charla virtual en español por Facebook para hablar con una epidemióloga local y así responder a preguntas y preocupaciones de la comunidad. 

La reportera bilingüe Natalie Van Hoozer de KUNR, quien organizó el evento, conversó con la periodista María Loreto Palma de Noticiero Móvil sobre los elementos clave de la charla. 

Digital event flyer. COVID-19 vaccines explained. A Facebook Live question and answer session in Spanish on Wednesday, February 10, at 5 p.m. Pacific Time.
KUNR

Lee en español. 

With information about COVID-19 vaccines evolving rapidly, KUNR recently put on a Facebook Live event in Spanish with a local epidemiologist to address questions and concerns.

Our bilingual reporter Natalie Van Hoozer hosted the Q&A and spoke with KUNR’s Jayden Perez to share highlights from the conversation. 

A closeup of a pharmacist filling a syringe with the COVID-19 vaccine.
Lucia Starbuck / KUNR Public Radio

Health officials say that a majority of Nevadans would need the COVID-19 vaccine for the population to receive herd immunity. That’s when enough people are immunized to slow the spread of infection. KUNR’s Lucia Starbuck has this explainer.


Bret Frey is a man who is wearing a face mask and sitting in his car. Through the window, a health worker administers the COVID-19 vaccine into his arm.
Lucia Starbuck / KUNR Public Radio

There was an air of excitement and a small round of applause as some of the first health care workers with Renown Health received their second shot of the COVID-19 vaccine Friday. This will ultimately provide them about 95% protection from the virus,  which has taken the lives of over 540 Washoe County residents as of Tuesday.

It may seem counterintuitive, but health officials say that even after you get vaccinated against COVID-19, you still need to practice the usual pandemic precautions, at least for a while. That means steering clear of crowds, continuing to wear a good mask in public, maintaining 6 feet or more of distance from people outside your household and frequently washing your hands. We talked to infectious disease specialists to get a better understanding of why.

Why do I have to continue with precautions after I've been vaccinated?

A color coded US map highlighting different rural areas that do not have pharmacies designated to distribute COVID-19 vaccines.
Screenshot / RUPRI Center for Rural Health Policy Analysis

When the COVID-19 vaccines become more widely available, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services will partner with retail pharmacies such as Costco and Walgreen to help distribute them. But a new analysis of rural counties finds that as many as 750 counties don't have one of those pharmacies.

Kolina Koltai first heard about the coronavirus back in January, but not from newspapers or TV. Instead, she read about it in anti-vaccination groups on Facebook.

"They were posting stories from China like, 'Hey, here's this mysterious illness,' or 'Here's this something that seems to be spreading,'" she said.

Updated 5:48 p.m. ET

A federal advisory committee to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention voted Tuesday to recommend who should get COVID-19 vaccines first once one is authorized for use.

A newly published study out of the University of Idaho suggests that the higher perceived risk of a disease, the more likely someone is to vaccinate.

The poll came from the Colorado Health Foundation but national polls over the past few months paint a similar picture.

The Food and Drug Administration has said it's open to making a COVID-19 vaccine available before phase 3 clinical trials are complete.

Stephen Hahn, commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, told the Financial Times last week that he was "prepared to authorize a vaccine before phase 3 clinical trials were complete, as long as officials believed the benefits outweighed the risks."

Typically, phase 1 trials involve a small number of volunteers.

A vaccine against the virus behind COVID-19 offers the only certain return to normalcy. Even so, misinformation and conspiracy theories abound – and a vaccine hasn’t even been developed yet. It’s an issue people have been trying to combat for other vaccines that do exist. Colorado researchers are taking an interesting approach to bridge the gap.

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