Savannah Maher | KUNR

Savannah Maher

Savannah comes to Wyoming Public Media from NPR’s midday show Here & Now, where her work explored everything from Native peoples’ fraught relationship with American elections to the erosion of press freedoms for tribal media outlets. A proud citizen of the Mashpee Wampanoag tribe, she’s excited to get to know the people of the Wind River reservation and dig into the stories that matter to them. 

Savannah got her start in journalism reporting for her hometown’s local newspaper (The Mashpee Enterprise) and public radio station (WCAI), and has since contributed to New Hampshire Public Radio, High Country News, and NPR’s Code Switch blog. She graduated from Dartmouth College in 2018.

  

Thre volunteers preparing swabs to test residents of a skilled nursing facility for COVID-19. The volunteers are wearing PPE from head to toe, which includes face masks, face shields, gowns and gloves.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Here are the latest news headlines for the morning of Wednesday, Aug. 11, 2021.

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Here are the local news headlines for the morning of Thursday, Aug. 5, 2021.

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Here are your local news headlines for the morning of Wednesday, Aug. 4, 2021.

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Google Maps

Here are your local news headlines for the morning of Tuesday, July 6, 2021.

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Here are your local news headlines for the morning of Friday, July 2, 2021.

Outside of their home in Bernalillo, N.M., 11-year-old Mililani Suina and her 8-year-old brother Marshall talk about some of their favorite foods from their tribal communities: the Pueblos of Cochiti, San Felipe and Santo Domingo.

"Tortillas are the biggest from Santo Domingo," Marshall says, stretching his arms out wide. "And from Cochiti, they're kind of, like, medium."

Mililani shares the different Keres words for a treat that's served on feast days.

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Wiki Commons

Here are your local news headlines for the morning of Monday, June 14, 2021.

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Courtesy City of Reno Twitter

Here are your local news headlines for the morning of Wednesday, June 9, 2021.

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Noah Glick / KUNR Public Radio

Here are your local news headlines for the morning of Friday, June 4, 2021.

The term "critical race theory" has made its way into public debates over education in the Mountain West, and how students should be taught about race and racism. But it's not clear that any K-12 schools in our region actually employ the decades-old academic framework. And as right-wing officials portray it as radical, those who study critical race theory say its meaning is being misconstrued.

Critical race theory is, in short, an approach to understanding structural racism in the United States.

An image of Senate Majority Leader Nicole Cannizzaro.
David Calvert / The Nevada Independent

Here are your morning news headlines for Monday, May 17, 2021.

David Calvert / The Nevada Independent

Here are your local news headlines for the morning of Friday, May 14, 2021.

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Courtesy Nevada Division of Environmental Protection

Here are your local morning news headlines for Wednesday, May 12, 2021.

President Biden has laid out his vision for the future of public education, which includes a nationwide community college tuition waiver for all Americans who want to take advantage.

That waiver would be especially impactful in states with the lowest levels of higher education attainment, including several in the Mountain West. In Idaho, Nevada, Wyoming and New Mexico, fewer than 30% of adults over 25 have a bachelor's degree.

An image inside the Nevada State Assembly.
David Calvert / The Nevada Independent

Here are your local news headlines for the morning of Thursday, May 6, 2021.

 

Many tribal leaders are used to stretching every dollar that comes their way. Last year, they were faced with a different problem: millions in badly needed aid money, and not enough time to spend it.

"The money came at us quick, and it was a flurry," said Karen Snyder, who coordinates pandemic response for the Eastern Shoshone Tribe in Wyoming. "We had to act fast in order to get it out the door."

An image of Tiehm's Buckwheat on a hillside.
Noah Glick / KUNR Public Radio

Here are your local news headlines for the morning of Friday, Apr. 23, 2021.

 

The Indian Child Welfare Act still stands, with some of its key provisions weakened by a sharply divided U.S. Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals this month. The 325-page opinion has no immediate impact on child welfare cases in the Mountain West, but it's likely to be challenged in the U.S. Supreme Court.

The Biden administration will restore the White House Council on Native American Affairs, an interagency initiative that coordinates federal services and policies that impact tribal nations. The council was first launched under former President Obama, but went dark for most of the Trump years.

 

Last month, Deb Haaland made history as the first Indigenous person ever confirmed by the Senate to serve in a president's cabinet. In her first official trip as secretary of the Interior, she visited the Mountain West with a focus on tribal issues.

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