Paul Boger

News Reporter

Paul grew up in Phoenix and earned his B.S. in Broadcast Journalism from Troy University in Alabama where he worked as a producer, editor and local host for Troy Public Radio. Paul then spent several years at Mississippi Public Broadcasting as the legislative and education reporter. His work there was featured on several NPR newscasts, All Things Considered, Morning Edition, PBS Newshour and the BBC.

He’s also collaborated with the NPR Ed and the Southern Education Desks on stories that have aired across the Southeast. That work has earned Paul several Mississippi AP Broadcasters Association Awards and a Regional Edward R. Murrow Award.

Paul is looking forward to calling Reno his new home. When he’s not working you can find him and his wife, Lynsey, playing with their dog, Hank. He also enjoys reading, running, hiking, camping, playing board games, collecting postcards, road tripping and, of course, listening to public radio and podcasts.

Durmick said, "The census is going to possibly create over $67 billion in funding for the state … which will go for things like public health and education and infrastructure, which the state is definitely going to need after the COVID-19 pandemic."
Crystal Willis / KUNR Public Radio

Sixty-seven billion dollars. That’s the amount of federal money census officials say Nevada stands to gain over the next decade. But with the current COVID-19 pandemic disrupting nearly every aspect of daily life, how are census takers ensuring an accurate count? KUNR’s Paul Boger spoke with Kerry Durmick, statewide census coordinator for Nevada Census 2020, to get an update.

Interim Superintendent Kristen McNeill stands at a podium speaking to reporters during a press conference.
Paul Boger / KUNR Public Radio

The Washoe County School District Board of Trustees has voted to end its search for a new superintendent and will likely name Interim Superintendent Kristen McNeill to the district’s top position. 

Libros de texto sobre en un escritorio en un salón de clase.
Alexa Ard

Las escuelas públicas de Nevada permanecen cerradas como parte del esfuerzo del estado para luchar contra la propagación de coronavirus. Pero para evitar que los estudiantes pierdan terreno a mitad del año académico, los distritos están recurriendo a planes de educación a distancia — osea por Internet. Para hablar de lo que esto significa para los 64,000 estudiantes inscritos en las escuelas del condado de Washoe, Paul Boger con la radio pública KUNR habló con Debbie Beirsdorff, la directora académica del distrito.

An illustration of an ultrastructural morphology exhibited by coronaviruses.
Alissa Eckert, MS; Dan Higgins, MAMS / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Coronavirus In Nevada Updates: Friday, April 3
 

8:00 p.m. | April 3, 2020 
By Bree Zender

35 At Willow Springs Center Sickened With COVID-19

Textbooks sitting on a desk in a classroom.
Alexa Ard

Public schools across Nevada remain closed as part of the state’s ongoing effort to fight the spread of the novel coronavirus. But to prevent students from losing ground midway through the academic year, districts are turning to distance learning plans. To talk about what that means for the 64,000 students enrolled in Washoe County schools, KUNR’s Paul Boger spoke with Debbie Biersdorff, the district’s chief academic officer.

An illustration of an ultrastructural morphology exhibited by coronaviruses.
Alissa Eckert, MS; Dan Higgins, MAMS / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Coronavirus In Nevada Updates: Thursday, March 26

9:19 p.m. | March 26, 2020
By Paul Boger

Nevada Cases Surpass 500

 

The number of COVID-19 cases in Nevada jumped by 115 on Thursday, bringing the statewide total to 535. That’s according to a late-night update of the state’s coronavirus dashboard. 

Kazmierski said, "Our community works well together and I'm confident that we will get through this in [the] not too distant future. In 90 days, we'll start to see a fairly reasonable recovery."
Paul Boger / KUNR

For roughly a decade, Nevada has maintained one of the fastest-growing economies in the country. But with non-essential businesses across the state shuttered due to the threat of the novel coronavirus, that economy is likely going to take a hit. Just how big of an impact COVID-19 will have remains to be seen. To suss that out, KUNR’s Paul Boger spoke with Mike Kazmierski, CEO of the Economic Development Authority of Western Nevada about the state’s economy and what recovery may look like.

An illustration of an ultrastructural morphology exhibited by coronaviruses.
Alissa Eckert, MS; Dan Higgins, MAMS / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
An illustration of an ultrastructural morphology exhibited by coronaviruses.
Alissa Eckert, MS; Dan Higgins, MAMS / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
What are you willing to do to save your own life and the lives of those you love? We absolutely must take this step for every Nevadan’s health and safety.
Crystal Willis / KUNR

Nevada Governor Steve Sisolak has ordered all non-essential businesses in the state to shut down for 30 days in order to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus. That includes bars, dine-in restaurants, retail stores, hotels, salons and barbershops. The closure even extends to the state’s gaming industry. Included on the list of non-essential are all casinos — which were shuttered last night. To help us break it all down is KUNR’s Paul Boger.

A sign with an arrow on it directs voters to the polls.
Tom Arthur / Wikimedia Commons

We’ve heard a lot about the presidential election this year, but it won’t be the only race on the ballot in November. Dozens of seats across the state are up for grabs in 2020 and as of Friday — the end of the candidate filing period — hundreds of people are vying for those positions. To help us break down that long list ahead of the June primary is KUNR’s Senior Political Reporter Paul Boger.

Nevada's Last Caucus?

Mar 12, 2020
Image of a sign that reads "caucus" with an arrow pointing into a gymnasium.
Noah Glick / KUNR Public Radio

Caucus... you've probably heard that word a lot this year. For some, it's a time-honored tradition that allows communities to come together to select a political candidate that best represents them. For others, it’s an overly complicated and outdated way of voting. So now that the Nevada Caucuses are firmly behind us, KUNR's Paul Boger decided to take a look at the Silver State’s caucus system and how it may evolve ahead of the next presidential election.

An illustration of an ultrastructural morphology exhibited by coronaviruses.
Alissa Eckert, MS; Dan Higgins, MAMS / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

For recent updates on Coronavirus in Nevada, visit our updates and resources webpage.

Coronavirus In Nevada Updates: Wednesday, March 18

10:17 p.m. PDT | March 18, 2020
By Michelle Billman

State Total Of COVID-19 Cases Hits 85

It'll be days before final tallies are released, but Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders is the projected winner of the California Primary. Polling ahead of yesterday's election showed Sanders with a comfortable lead among voters in the Golden State, but that was before more moderate candidates like Minnesota Senator Amy Klobuchar and former South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg dropped out of the race and endorsed former Vice President Joe Biden. So we sent KUNR's Paul Boger across the state line to get a sense of how the shake-up may have affected voters in California. 

A man uses a voting machine.
Jacob Solis / KUNR Public Radio

California is the single biggest prize in the Democratic presidential nomination process. 415 delegates are up for grabs in Tuesday's primary. To get the latest about how the race is shaping up in the Golden State, KUNR's Paul Boger spoke with Scott Shafer, KQED's politics editor.

Amy Klobuchar waves to supporters from a stage.
Paul Boger

Democratic presidential hopeful, Amy Klobuchar, has made her first appearance in Northern Nevada following avstrong showing in Iowa and New Hampshire.

Tom Steye walks down the street speaking with local buiness owners.
Lucia Starbuck

And then there were seven...that’s how many Democrats will be up for consideration in Nevada’s Democratic presidential caucus, but with so many candidates in the race, how are voters selecting a preferred candidate? KUNR’s Paul Boger spoke with some voters in Northern Nevada to find out.

"We got people calling each other names. We got people giving each other the stink eye ... not that it's been calm the last three years," Amodei said.
Paul Boger / KUNR

As the calendar creeps closer and closer to Nevada's caucus, we've heard from a lot of Democrats about the current state of the nation's capital. So we decided to check in with the Silver State's lone Republican in Congress — 2nd District Representative Mark Amodei.

Often when we think about diversity and inclusion, we look at it through a lens crafted by years of training seminars and decades of awareness campaigns. Whether it’s workshops, consultants or modules, the diversity industry has become a multibillion-dollar business, and yet, there seems to be a continual need for more attention to be paid to diversity efforts across all spectrums of American life.

"It does seem... that [Biden] and [Sanders] are out in front, but a lot can change... before we get to Nevada," Messerly said.
Paul Boger / KUNR

There’s officially less than one month until Democratic voters across the Silver State are expected to come together to select their party’s preferred candidate for president. But with only 31 days until the Nevada caucus, some presidential hopefuls still have a lot of work to do if they hope to win the First in the West contest. KUNR’s Paul Boger spoke to Megan Messerly, The Nevada Independent’s lead 2020 reporter, to help break down the race so far.

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