Noah Glick

Mountain West News Bureau Reporter

Growing up in Indiana, Noah Glick is a Westerner at heart. As a reporter in Reno, Nevada, he covers issues affecting the Mountain West, including climate change, economics, water rights, energy and culture.

Outside of work, you might catch him outside hiking, camping or playing inline hockey.

An image of a saliva collection tube
Noah Glick

Researchers in the Mountain West are hoping to pioneer a new type of COVID-19 test that requires only a person’s saliva and can easily be done at home.

The Healthy Nevada Project is a community-based population health study, the largest of its kind in the world. Researchers behind the public-private partnership have collected DNA samples from the saliva of 50,000 Nevadans, with the goal of reaching a million samples statewide.

An image of a hospital tower run by Intermountain Healthcare.
Andy D. / Flickr Creative Commons

As hospitals continue to fill up with COVID-19 patients, one major health care provider in the Mountain West announced it’s cutting pay for some of its medical staff.

An illustration of an ultrastructural morphology exhibited by coronaviruses.
Alissa Eckert, MS; Dan Higgins, MAMS / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Coronavirus In Nevada Updates: Friday, April 3
 

8:00 p.m. | April 3, 2020 
By Bree Zender

35 At Willow Springs Center Sickened With COVID-19

You probably got a letter in the mail recently from the U.S. Census Bureau asking you to fill out its survey. And maybe you're thinking, I don't have time for this! I just lost my job and I don't know how I'm going to pay my mortgage in the next couple of months! My kids are home and they're driving me crazy!

An image showing the entrance of the Nevada Southern Detention Center.
Google Maps

Support for our series Private Prison: Locking Down The Facts came from The Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, a non-profit news organization that partners with journalists and newsrooms to support in-depth reporting and education around the globe.

An illustration of an ultrastructural morphology exhibited by coronaviruses.
Alissa Eckert, MS; Dan Higgins, MAMS / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Coronavirus In Nevada Updates: Thursday, March 26

9:19 p.m. | March 26, 2020
By Paul Boger

Nevada Cases Surpass 500

 

The number of COVID-19 cases in Nevada jumped by 115 on Thursday, bringing the statewide total to 535. That’s according to a late-night update of the state’s coronavirus dashboard. 

An image of the inside of the Westgate Resorts Superbook.
Westgate Resorts

The COVID-19 pandemic is now threatening the Tokyo 2020 Summer Olympics, following a number of high-profile sporting events that have already been postponed or canceled. These cancelations have some sportsbooks looking for different things to bet on.

An image of customers checking out at a grocery store.
Paul Boger / KUNR Public Radio

Walk into many grocery stores these days, and you’ll see two things: crowds and empty shelves. You may also notice narrow aisles and checkout lines that make it hard to practice the social distancing recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

While many businesses are shutting down to help stop the spread of COVID-19, grocery stores don’t have that luxury. And grocery workers like cashiers don’t make that much - at most, around $15 an hour. But like health care workers, they’re considered essential.

An image of the Las Vegas strip with a storm cloud looming overhead.
Thomas Hawk / Flickr

The COVID-19 pandemic is forcing federal, state and local governments to take drastic measures. And in Nevada, Gov. Steve Sisolak did something never done before: he ordered all casinos in the state to shut down for 30 days.

An image of a basketball game with a large crowd.
University of Nevada, Reno

COVID-19 is halting sports events around the country. The National Basketball Association, the National Hockey League and Major League Soccer are all suspended. And March Madness is canceled.

That’s affecting one industry particularly hard: sports betting.

An illustration of an ultrastructural morphology exhibited by coronaviruses.
Alissa Eckert, MS; Dan Higgins, MAMS / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

For recent updates on Coronavirus in Nevada, visit our updates and resources webpage.

Coronavirus In Nevada Updates: Wednesday, March 18

10:17 p.m. PDT | March 18, 2020
By Michelle Billman

State Total Of COVID-19 Cases Hits 85

An image of a dusty parcel of land showing crops completely dried out from drought.
NOAA

Researchers in our region are arguing for new models to better plan for a recent climate phenomenon: flash droughts. According to a new paper published in the journal Nature Climate Change, these events present new challenges for climate predictors.

An image of a train hauling large pipes to be used for oil and gas pipelines.
Nate Hegyi / KUER

The deadline is tonight to submit public comment on sweeping changes to one of the nation’s bedrock environmental laws.

An image showing a large, overpass made of dirt that allows widlife to cross Interstate-80 in eastern Nevada.
Nevada Department of Transportation

In today’s partisan political climate, one thing most Westerners seem to agree on is the need to protect wildlife corridors.

Wildlife corridors are historic wildlife migration routes. And sometimes, those routes need protecting. It could be as simple as restoring some native species, or it could involve building a grassy overpass over a busy highway.

A close-up image of a sage grouse, a wide, chicken-like bird.
Bureau of Land Management

A federal judge in Idaho has ruled against the Trump administration’s decision to limit public input when leasing the West’s public lands to oil and gas drillers. The decision voids five oil and gas leases in three states.

An image of oil drills on public lands.
Bureau of Land Management

On the 100th anniversary of the Mineral Leasing Act of 1920, the nonpartisan group Taxpayers for Common Sense published a report Tuesday calling for an increase in the royalty rate on publicly owned oil and gas.

The Pyramid Lake Paiute Reservation is one of the largest in the state. But, some tribal members say they feel ignored by politicians locally and nationally.

Noah Glick visited Pyramid Lake High School for the caucus over the weekend. He met up with Norman Harry, the former chairman for the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe to discuss voter turnout and the 2020 Election more generally.

Image of a sign that reads "caucus" with an arrow pointing into a gymnasium.
Noah Glick / KUNR Public Radio

Nevada’s caucuses are now over and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders was the declared winner, but what was the experience like for native voters? And what did they have to say?

An image of a person working in waterways in Idaho.
U.S. Geological Survey

Earlier this month, the Trump administration released its budget proposal for next year. It included significant cuts to the U.S. Geological Survey, but that agency’s director told the Mountain West News Bureau that’s not going to happen.

An image of a man wiping down a large array of solar panels.
U.S. Department of Energy

Solar jobs are up across the U.S., after two consecutive years of declines. But that growth is mixed in our region.

According to the latest report from the nonprofit solar energy advocate, The Solar Foundation, more than 5,600 solar jobs were added last year.

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