Noah Glick

Mountain West News Bureau Reporter

Growing up in Indiana, Noah Glick is a Westerner at heart. As a reporter in Reno, Nevada, he covers issues affecting the Mountain West, including climate change, economics, water rights, energy and culture.

Outside of work, you might catch him outside hiking, camping or playing inline hockey.

The front exterior of a residence. There are eviction notices posted on the home's front door.
Drew Tyre / Flickr Creative Commons

Millions of renters nationwide are at risk of eviction, and new data out of Nevada offers a sense of just how urgent the situation is as Congress debates another COVID-19 relief bill.

An illustration of an ultrastructural morphology exhibited by coronaviruses.
Alissa Eckert, MS; Dan Higgins, MAMS / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

6:38 p.m. | August 4, 2020

Nevada National Guard Extended
By Noah Glick

Nevada Gov. Steve Sisolak announced Tuesday that hundreds of Nevada National Guardsmen will remain on duty through the rest of the year to help deal with the effects of COVID-19.

A picture of a census form
Enayet Raheem / Unsplash

The U.S. Census is underway, and many communities of color across the nation are vulnerable to being undercounted this year.

According to a new analysis from Headwaters Economics, more than 700,000 people of color are at risk of being undercounted in the Mountain West alone.

An illustration of an ultrastructural morphology exhibited by coronaviruses.
Alissa Eckert, MS; Dan Higgins, MAMS / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

7:08 p.m. | July 21, 2020

Three New COVID-19 Deaths In Washoe Co.
By Noah Glick

The Regional Incident Command is reporting three new deaths from COVID-19 Tuesday. That brings the total deaths from the virus countywide to 105.

An image of a boat in the middle of a beautiful, blue alpine lake in Glacier National Park.
National Park Service

The Department of Interior is proposing a rule change that could open the door for more private companies to operate within national parks.

Two hikers at the top of a peak in Yellowstone National Park.
National Park Service

As the pandemic wears on, leaders across the country are looking at how to economically recover after the COVID-19 pandemic. Some in the Mountain West are calling for more outdoor recreation spending.

An illustration of an ultrastructural morphology exhibited by coronaviruses.
Alissa Eckert, MS; Dan Higgins, MAMS / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

6:38 p.m. | July 14, 2020

State Leaders Urge Continued Vigilance Against COVID-19
By Noah Glick

State officials are urging the public to continue its vigilance in the fight against COVID-19, as more than 1,100 new cases are reported Tuesday.

A row of houses along a street
Courtesy of the Department of Housing and Urban Development

After 27 months of continual decline, the number of Americans falling behind on their mortgage payments is on the rise.

A graphic showing a medical professional giving a patient a nasal swab used for COVID-19 testing.
United Nations COVID-19 Response / Unsplash

Coverage of novel coronavirus is supported by the Mick Hitchcock, Ph.D., Project for Visualizing Science, a science reporting project from the Reynolds School of Journalism.

The number of active COVID-19 cases in Washoe County is significantly higher than what’s being reported. That’s according to the results from the first COVID-19 antibody study out Wednesday.

A close-up image of a Uhaul moving truck.
Joey Rozier / Creative Commons

Millions of Americans have been relocated due to the coronavirus pandemic, according to a recent survey from the Pew Research Center.

The survey, conducted in early June, shows that 22% of Americans either have moved or know someone who has because of the pandemic. That translates to more than 72 million people.

A desert landscape in the foreground and mountains in the background.
Noah Glick

The U.S. Military could gain control over more than 1,300 square miles of public land in Nevada currently managed as a wildlife refuge under a bill passed by a congressional committee last week.

Element5 Digital / Unsplash

The voting process has long disenfranchised Native American communities. With the COVID-19 pandemic and mail-in voting exacerbating the problem, U.S. senators in the Mountain West and across the country are asking the federal government to make sure voters in Indian Country can cast ballots come November.

An image of a character in Animal Crossing New Horizons sitting in a field of flowers
Nintendo

Between a global pandemic, the economic downturn and civil unrest across the country, Americans are facing high levels of stress and uncertainty, and many are turning to video games for relief.

This reporter happens to be one of them. But can these virtual experiences help in the real world?

A map of the Western U.S., showing varying levels of drought.
United States Drought Monitor

As the country turned its attention toward the pandemic, something else was creeping into the Mountain West: drought conditions.

An image of a man fishing in a river.
Department of Interior

Most businesses in the outdoor recreation industry are seeing sales decline because of the novel coronavirus pandemic, and 88% are reporting that they’ve had to lay off or furlough employees.

A crew of firefighters walking through a forest.
USFS Gila National Forest

Wildfire season is upon us. As fire crews start heading out, politicians and the Trump administration are at odds over the measures needed to keep firefighters safe and on the job.

An illustration of an ultrastructural morphology exhibited by coronaviruses.
Alissa Eckert, MS; Dan Higgins, MAMS / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

7:32 p.m. | June 16, 2020

Nevada Reports Highest Single-Day COVID-19 Case Jump
By Lucia Starbuck

An image of a humvee being used by police departments.
Estes Park Police Department

The ongoing protests over police brutality is highlighting another ongoing issue: the militarization of police departments.

An image of a protestor waving an upside-down American flag.
Chase Stevens / Las Vegas Review-Journal

Three Nevadans face terrorism-related charges after allegedly plotting to incite violence at recent protests in Las Vegas over the death of George Floyd, a black man who was killed while in police custody.

An illustration of an ultrastructural morphology exhibited by coronaviruses.
Alissa Eckert, MS; Dan Higgins, MAMS / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

7:08 p.m. | June 9, 2020

Nevada Reports Highest Spike Of New COVID-19 Cases
By Lucia Starbuck

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