Noah Glick

Nevada Reporter

Growing up in Indiana, Noah Glick is a Westerner at heart. As a reporter in Reno, Nevada, he covers issues affecting the Mountain West, including climate change, economics, water rights, energy and culture.

Outside of work, you might catch him outside hiking, camping or playing inline hockey.

Joe Biden supporters display a giant poster of the former Vice President wearing his trademark Aviator sunglasses with the outline of Nevada in the background.
Noah Glick

Las Vegas had more than gaming, entertainment and live shows Sunday night. The First in the West caucus event, hosted by the Nevada Democratic Party, gave Democratic Presidential hopefuls a chance to make their pitch to Nevada Democrats.

Miss the event? No problem. We've got photos for you right here.

New Jersey Senator Cory Booker (left) jokes with Former Massachusetts Governor and newly-announced Presidential candidate, Deval Patrick (right).
Noah Glick

Fourteen Democratic presidential candidates gathered in Las Vegas Sunday to make their pitch to Nevada voters.

The Mountain West News Bureau’s Noah Glick covered the event and chatted with KUNR about it.

Climate Central

As an increasing number of states focus on renewable energy, batteries are becoming more of a necessity. And according to a new report, battery costs are dropping—but not enough to compete with fossil fuels.

The report comes from Climate Central, a nonprofit organization that studies the impacts of climate change. In it, the authors state that batteries and renewable energy sources are becoming cheaper by the year.

Wildfire smoke crosses the U.S. on jetstream
NASA

For much of the last decade, air pollution was decreasing. But it’s now on the rise, particularly in the West.

That’s according to a recent study by the National Bureau of Economic Research. It found that between 2016 and 2018, the levels of fine particulate matter increased 11.5% in the West. California's been impacted the most.

State of Colorado

As the Trump administration begins the process of withdrawing the U.S. from the Paris climate agreement, three states in the Mountain West pledge to follow the tenets of the accord anyway.

Ed Franklin shows one participant how to take a reading on a solar panel, during the Native Waters on Arid Lands 2019 Tribal Summit in Reno, Nev.
DRI / Native Waters on Arid Lands

The climate crisis is threatening traditional ways of life throughout Indian Country. Now, tribal leaders and scientists are working together to help reservations become more climate resilient.

A mountain goat, the basis for the Backcountry.com logo
Glacier National Park

After filing trademark protections last year, the Utah-based e-commerce giant Backcountry.com has filed several lawsuits against organizations with the word “backcountry” in their names.

UNLV Sociology Professor Simon Gottschalk
University of Nevada, Las Vegas

With white supremacist violence on the rise nationwide, a University of Nevada, Las Vegas sociologist is studying how the Internet can turn hateful feelings into deadly actions.

In most of the West, a deer killed by a vehicle, such as this one in Idaho, could be harvested for its meat. But not in Nevada and Wyoming.
Idaho Department of Fish and Game

Most states in the Mountain West allow people to harvest roadkill, and California passed its own “roadkill bill” earlier this week.

But Nevada and Wyoming are holding out. They are the only states in our region that don’t allow the harvesting of meat from animals killed by vehicles.

UNLV Graduate Student Monserrath Hernandez speaks at a panel event celebrating the launch of a podcast highlighting the work of the Latinx Voices of Southern Nevada project.
UNLV University Libraries

The Latino and Hispanic population is the largest ethnic minority group in the United States. But many of their stories are left out of the historical record.

Across the country, a number of academic institutions are trying to change that, one oral history at a time. One of the latest is in Nevada.

A wildlife overpass on the Flathead Indian Reservation in western Montana
Montana Department of Transportation

This time of year the number of vehicle collisions with deer and other wildlife are at their highest, a problem that’s especially acute in parts of the Mountain West.

On Tuesday, officials in Nevada held a summit to discuss how the state can address an issue that each year results in more than 500 reported crashes, costs taxpayers more than $19 million, and kills an estimated 5,000 wild animals, according to the Nevada Department of Transportation.

Utah, Colorado and Montana have some of the lowest rates of childhood obesity in the country.
The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Mountain West states have some of the lowest rates of youth obesity in the country, according to a new report from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

Utah's rate of 8.7% was found to be the lowest in the country, while Colorado and Montana, with rates of 10.7% and 10.8%, respectively, were also among the six states with obesity rates statistically significantly lower than the national average of 15.3%.

Supreme Court Justice Neil M. Gorsuch takes the judicial oath of office in 2017. Gorsuch may be the deciding vote in a case over whether the Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity.
Franz Jantzen / Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States

The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday began hearing cases on employment protections for LGBTQ workers, and conservative Justice Neil M. Gorsuch, who hails from Colorado, is likely the deciding vote.

The University of Colorado Boulder Folsom Field
The University of Colorado Boulder

States in the Mountain West could follow California’s lead in allowing student-athletes to seek sponsorships and other business deals while in college.

Map of federal public lands in the West. BLM lands shown in yellow. The red pin marks Grand Junction, Colorado.
Headwaters Economics / headwaterseconomics.org

The Bureau of Land Management is moving more staff and—perhaps most significantly—its headquarters to the Mountain West.

Depending on who you ask, relocating the BLM’s headquarters from Washington, D.C. to Grand Junction, Colorado will make the agency more efficient, give preferential treatment to the fossil fuel industry—or even functionally dismantle it.

U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis

Personal income is on the rise across the country, and some of the biggest increases are in Mountain West states, according to data published last week by the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis.

U.S. Geological Survey

Chronic Wasting Disease is a wildlife illness similar to Mad Cow Disease.  It’s rooted itself in the Mountain West and is thinning herds throughout the region.

Nevada and Idaho are the only states in our region with no confirmed cases of the highly contagious and fatal wildlife infection. But that doesn’t mean it hasn’t made it there.

U.S. Department of Energy

Waste from the nation's worst nuclear accident could remain in our region for another 20 years.

In 1979, a nuclear reactor had a partial meltdown at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Generating Station in Pennsylvania. And the waste from that incident has been living in Idaho since the 1980s.

Noah Glick

From ATMs to self-checkout lines, automation technology is everywhere. And there’s a growing fear that as technology advances it could eliminate millions of American jobs.

According to at least one report, our region is especially vulnerable, having three of the top five states most at risk. But some here are already taking steps to help soften the blow.

BLM Oregon / CC BY 2.0

Along with its new headquarters in Grand Junction, Colorado, the Bureau of Land Management is expected to bring hundreds of jobs to our region. But, there is some confusion on the specifics.

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