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Nevada's story has been written in glowing, colorful neon lights for nearly a century. The vivid tubes were beacons for travelers and mavericks. They also spelled out optimism and illuminated the pioneering spirit of people across the state. As modern technology advances, what is happening to this ubiquitous symbol? Is there still a place for neon in the modern silver state? Holly Hutchings takes a look at Northern Nevada's Neon. Discover more below.

Video: 38 Years Of Making Neon In Northern Nevada

A man stands in front of a work table, holding a small neon sign.
Krysta Scripter
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Ken Hines in his shop, where he does wholesale repairs for local neon signs.

Ken Hines has been working with neon for 38 years and describes himself as the last full-time neon tube-bender in Northern Nevada, making him an asset to the local sign industry. He won't be around forever though, and when KUNR first met him, he was looking for an apprentice. 

Since then, he's found one, and he expects to stay in business for another 10 or so years while also teaching his craft to the next generation.  KUNR took a look inside his studio at Artech to learn more. 

Hear Holly Hutchings' original story on Ken Hines here and check out her series Sparked: Northern Nevada's Neon

Krysta Scripter is a former digital services assistant at KUNR Public Radio.
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