Anh Gray

Health Reporter

Anh Gray is a health reporter for the KUNR news team. She joined the station in 2014 as a producer. She has graduate degrees in public health from Boston University and in education degree from Teachers College, Columbia University.

 

In 2017, Anh received an award from the Associated Press Television Radio Association (APTRA) for best reporter. That year, Anh covered a variety of pressing public health issues like health care reform, the opioid epidemic and disease outbreaks. Other APTRA honors in the last several years include first place for spot news for her production of an anti-campus gun carry protest and second place for best public service reporting on her coverage of the opioid epidemic. Anh was also a contributing reporter for two series that won regional Edward R. Murrow awards: one on electric car maker, Tesla, and another on the impact of legalizing recreational marijuana in Nevada.

 

In 2018, Anh was chosen to participate in the National Press Foundation Innovations in Public Health Fellowship. The International Center For Journalists-United Nations Foundation selected Anh in 2016 for a fellowship focusing on sustainable development issues. She attended the UN General Assembly and met with experts. As a result of this experience, Anh produced several stories covering access to health care for Syrian refugees in Northern Nevada, the lack of Native American doctors in the region and the rising concern of antimicrobial resistance.

 

Health policy, access to health care, and community health issues are Anh’s primary interests. She also enjoys covering innovations in the prevention of disease and the promotion of wellness. Those stories include nutrition, evidence-based health initiatives and medical breakthroughs.

 

Her home life is filled with the mayhem and laughter of three children, who also happen to be huge public radio fans. When not chasing after her next radio story, Anh enjoys spending time with her family hiking along the scenic trails around Lake Tahoe or taking off on weekned road trips.

 

 

Disaster planning often focuses on treating adults and overlooks the special needs of children. KUNR’s Anh Gray reports as more communities nationwide experience gun violence, emergency workers are learning how to care for young victims of mass shootings.

Photo of a handgun.
Alexa Ard

A federal grant for more than $650,000 is meant to help Northern Nevada law enforcement agencies prevent firearm-related crimes. KUNR’s Anh Gray talked with Detective Lieutenant Zach Thew with the Reno Police Department about the Reno Gun Initiative, which launched last year.   

Quote from Dr. Tony Slonim of Renown Health reading “I am…a pediatric intensive care doctor and have, unfortunately, attended to children as young as four years of age who have been shot because of inadvertent gun use. Those images stick in your brain..."
Michelle Matus

Doctors nationwide have been weighing in on the gun control debate with #ThisIsOurLane on social media. They're responding to a recent tweet from the National Rifle Association, which admonished the American College of Physicians for declaring gun violence as a public health issue in a new position paper and said doctors should 'stay in their lane.'

KUNR's Anh Gray talked to the president and CEO of Renown Health, Dr. Tony Slonim, about why he and other medical professionals are speaking out. 

fire burning trees on mountain
Matt Howard via Unsplash

A recent federal climate change report offers a grim outlook on the future. More wildfires, poorer air-quality and an increase in heat-related illnesses are expected. KUNR’s Anh Gray spoke with Tim Brown, an expert from the Desert Research Institute, to get his perspective on what global warming means for the health and safety of Nevadans.

Black and white photo of a wheelchair in a room.
Pexels

At this year’s ballot box, Nevada voters may decide whether some medical equipment will get a sales tax exemption. KUNR’s Anh Gray has the details.

Republican Senator Dean Heller and Democratic Congresswoman Jacky Rosen traded barbs in their first and only debate. KUNR’s Anh Gray reports health care took center stage.

A picture of feminine hygiene products on store shelf.
By Stilfehler from Wikimedia Commons

Voters may soon decide whether to eliminate the sales tax on feminine hygiene products. KUNR’s Anh Gray has more.

A group of people are sitting in the office of the Democratic Party of Wahoe County. They are making phone calls to registered Democrats to get them to vote in the midterm election.
Anh Gray

The Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, united Republicans nationwide. In the last election, many GOP candidates promised to dismantle it. But that turned out to be a struggle and Democrats have now taken on health care as their key issue to drive out the vote this midterm. KUNR's Anh Gray has more.

The photo is the front of the Nevada State Legislature buidling in Carson City, Nevada.
Alexa Ard

Several factors could shape the upcoming midterm election in Nevada. The Nevada Secretary of State announced earlier this week that there are slightly more than 1.5 million active registered voters, a record-breaking number.

Currently, Democrats are close to having 70,000 more registered voters than Republicans, accounting for a nearly five-point lead. The Silver State could also make history as the first female-majority led statehouse.

KUNR’s Anh Gray checks in with a Truckee Meadows Community College Political Science Professor Precious Hall to learn how this election could play out.

A picture of DNA.
Max Pixel, licensed for public domain use

About 35,000 Nevadans have already received no-cost genetic testing through the Healthy Nevada Project. KUNR’s Anh Gray reports researchers have new findings to share.

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