Anh Gray | KUNR

Anh Gray

Public Health Editor

Anh is a public health editor for the KUNR news team and has been with the station since 2014. She is an alumna of the Boston University School of Public Health and Teachers College, Columbia University.

 

Anh is the recipient of the 2019 Minnotte Health Reporting Fellowship from the Radio Television Digital News Foundation. She is also a two time recipient of the Associated Press Television Radio Association (APTRA) best reporter honor for her work in 2017 and 2019. She also received the 2019 Regional Edward R. Murrow Award in hard news reporting for her story about healthcare disparities for the LGBTQ+ community. She has also covered a variety of pressing public health issues like health care reform, the opioid epidemic, and disease outbreaks including the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

Other professional experiences include mentorship with NPR's Next Generation Radio and Report for America, participation in the 2018 National Press Foundation Innovations in Public Health Fellowship, and the 2016 International Center For Journalists-United Nations Foundation Fellowship. She has also served as a judge for the National Edward R. Murrow Awards. 

 

Her home life is filled with the mayhem and laughter of three children, who also happen to be huge public radio fans. When not chasing after her next radio story, Anh enjoys spending time with her family hiking along the scenic trails around Lake Tahoe or taking off on weekend road trips.

 

 

Mosquitos infected with the West Nile virus have been found in Spanish Springs.

Jim Shaffer, who is with the Washoe County Health District, says mosquito trapping and testing have been ongoing all summer. As soon as mosquitos test positive for the virus, the district has to act fast.

“You don’t want mosquitos to bite people or transmit disease," Shaffer says. "So when they become an adult, they have both those capabilities and they’re moving.”

A new portable classroom unit that is awaiting installation at Brown Elementary School.
Photo by Anh Gray

Students head back to school on Monday, but there aren’t enough classrooms for everyone. To alleviate the over-crowding, the Washoe County School District is installing about a dozen portable classrooms at several schools.  

From the inside, the third grade portable classroom at Brown Elementary in South Reno doesn’t look much different than a typical brick-and-mortar set-up.  There are colorful maps and flags on the walls along with piles of neatly stacked textbooks. 

Never-before-displayed Civil War-era muster rolls are on display. These lists contain the signatures of Nevadans that participated in the U.S. Service.
Photo by Anh Gray

The Nevada Museum of Art will celebrate the state’s 150th birthday with an exhibition showcasing historic treasures. The display will briefly include the Emancipation Proclamation.

In 1864, Nevada officially became the 36th state, and that’s the same number of hours the Emancipation Proclamation will be available for viewing at the museum in downtown Reno.

Reno has recently added 25 solar-powered trash compactors to the downtown corridor. After this trial run, many more could be popping up around town.

“Rather high-tech,” is how Sarah Polito, a spokesperson for Waste Management of Nevada, describes the compactors.

“Think mission impossible style, if you will,” Polito says. “There are laser beams within the compactor.”

Nevada is one of the top 15 most business friendly states. That’s according to a recently released national survey.

So the good news is that overall small business owners consider Nevada a business friendly place. That’s based on the annual survey done by Thumbtack.com, an online marketplace that links consumers to professional services.

Jon Lieber is an economist who worked on the survey.

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