Camille Stuyvesant | KUNR

Camille Stuyvesant

Camille Stuyvesant is a former bilingual student reporter at KUNR Public Radio.

Photo of a smiling woman wearing a white shirt and sitting at a blue table outside, with trees and part of a brick building behind her.
Our Town Reno

A 24-year-old woman, who goes by the name Legendary Baby Bleu, has been a prostitute in Reno since she was 16 when she was attending Hug High School. Last year, she decided to leave an apartment she shared with her ex-boyfriend and she became homeless. Today, she shares her experience of trying to leave prostitution behind and the difficulties she has encountered on the streets.

Camille Stuyvesant

President Donald Trump is calling for an end to “chain migration” along with tighter legal immigration control, but what exactly does that term mean? The misconception is that any immigrant can bring as many family members as they would like when they come to the United States. In actuality, the process is much lengthier, in some cases taking up to 23 years, and is limited to certain family members. Our reporter, Camille Stuyvesant spoke with immigration attorney Sylvia Ontaneda-Bernales to break down 'chain migration.'

1. The Benefactors

Camille Stuyvesant

Durante un día en el mes de enero, las ciudades en todo el país realizan una encuesta en cada condado para determinar la población sin hogar. En Reno, recientemente los organizadores llevaron a cabo este evento llamado Point-In-Time Count. A partir de esta encuesta se determinó que el número de jóvenes sin hogar entre los 18 y 24 años de edad está aumentando.  

Neftalí Cruz Nicolás

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The deadline for Congress to come to a decision about the future of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program has come and gone with no clear solution. The 700,000 recipients are living in a continued state of uncertainty. Our reporter Camille Stuyvesant recently spoke with a local DACA recipient about her experiences.

 

 

 

 

Camille Stuyvesant

For one day in January, cities across the country hold a point-in-time count to survey the homeless population in their county. In Reno, organizers recently hosted an event to count homeless youths, specifically. They found that the number of 18-to-24 year-olds without a home is on the rise.