Nevada sports

Illustrated by Stephanie Serrano

Nationwide, close to 21 million people are living with diabetes. Ninety percent of them are living with type 2 diabetes but just 10 percent are diagnosed with type 1, which can be debilitating. Trey Porter is a type 1 diabetic as well as a division one collegiate athlete serving as a starter for the University of Nevada, Reno men’s basketball team, which has gained national attention.

Nevada assistant coach, Gus Argenal goes over plays at practice before game day with Wolf Pack starters.
Stephanie Serrano

After a 6 a.m. phone call from head coach Eric Musselman, Gus Argenal left his head coaching position at Cal State East Bay to join the Nevada Men’s Basketball team as the assistant coach in the summer of 2017. Argenal sat down with KUNR to give an inside look at what it takes to help coach the 24-2 Nevada Wolf Pack.

Part two of our series on UNR's sports programs and facilities and how they impact each other. Reno Public Radio's Esther Ciammachilli toured the campus with Athletic Director Doug Knuth. This segment features the crumbling and unusable tennis complex and the shipping containers that inconspicuously house the rifle team's training and competition site. 

Next week on Beyond the Headlines, the final installment of our series on UNR's sports programs and facilities. We'll take a look at a complex located across the track from the school. 

Upgrades to Mackay Stadium, other UNR sports "home" less

Jan 26, 2015

Mackay Stadium at UNR is in serious need to renovations and upgrades and a new $11 million dollar loan is going to fix it.  Doug Knuth, Director of Athletics at UNR took Reno Public Radio's Esther Ciammachilli to the football field to explain exactly what the school plans to do with this money and how they'll pay it back. 

This is part one in a series where we explore several of UNR's sports programs and facilities - including women's track, tennis and rifle - and how they impact each other.

NCAA.com

The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) holds all Division I schools accountable for the academic progress of their student-athletes through the Academic Progress Rate (APR), a team-based metric that accounts for the eligibility and retention of each student-athlete per term.  Every semester, each athlete receives one point for remaining eligible to play, and one point for returning to school, for a total of two points per athlete, per team.  The APR has been in place for ten years now and since its launch, the NCAA is reporting more than 13,000 student-athletes have returned to