e-cigarettes

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Public health officials in Nevada are urging people to stop using e-cigarettes as the country grapples with an epidemic of vaping-related severe lung illness. KUNR’s Anh Gray reports.

The current measles outbreak across several states is highlighting the need for rapid response from local public health agencies. In Nevada, financial investment in public health ranks 50th in the nation. KUNR’s Anh Gray explores what that low investment means for Washoe County.

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The Food and Drug Administration is considering a plan that would curb the use of electronic-cigarettes among teenagers. As Reno Public Radio’s Anh Gray reports, a group of Nevada researchers found that a significant amount of cancer-causing chemicals remain in the lungs from vaping.

Desert Research Institute

Gummi Bear, Tutti Fruitty, and Bubble Gum are just a few e-cigarette flavors. The Desert Research Institute recently discovered that they produce toxic chemicals during vaping. Reno Public Radio’s Anh Gray has the details.

American Association of Poison Control Centers

The Washoe County Health District held a series of community meetings recently to discuss what health care providers, public health workers and child care staff can do to help prevent poisonings. Reno Public Radio’s Noah Glick has more.

Shireen Banerji is with the Nevada Poison Center and was a presenter at the meetings. She says most calls to poison control centers affect young children.

“Over half of our calls, in general, for the Nevada Poison Center, are children five years and younger,” she says.

Nicotine poisoning in Nevada is on the rise and almost three-quarters of those incidences involve children. Reno Public Radio’s Anh Gray has more.

The state’s poison control hotline has been receiving a spike in calls for accidental nicotine poisoning. Kelli Goatley-Seals is with the Washoe County Health District. She says that between the number of calls doubled in the state between 2013 and 2014.

“In 2014, we saw 44 calls and more than 70 percent of them related to children between the ages of zero to five,” Goatley-Seals says.