police reform | KUNR

police reform

A person dressed in all black holds a piece of white cardboard that reads, “Police brutality is domestic terror.” Behind the person is a Reno Police Department SUV and police officers.
Ty O’Neil / This Is Reno

This week marks one year since the murder of George Floyd at the hands of police. In this commentary, KUNR Youth Media reporter May Wells shares her thoughts on some of the concrete actions needed to instill lasting change.

An image of Assembly Majority Leader Teresa Benitez-Thompson alongside Assembly Leader Jason Frierson
David Calvert / The Nevada Independent

Here are your local morning news headlines for Wednesday, May 26, 2021.

KUNR Today: Grim Fire Season Outlook, COVID-19 Cases Continue To Decrease In Nevada

May 25, 2021
A close-up image of a fire engine.
Jana Sayson / KUNR Public Radio

Here are your morning news headlines for Tuesday, May 25, 2021.

Elaine Maestas remembers her sister, Elisha Lucero, going out of her way to help people.

“Even if it was like the last of her money, the last 20 dollars, and she knew you needed gas to get to work, didn't matter if you were a friend, a family member or somebody that she just met, she would help you out,” Maestas said.

How far has America come in enacting meaningful police reform since George Floyd’s death nearly one year ago? That question faces renewed scrutiny with the rare verdict against ex-police officer Derek Chauvin. On Tuesday a Minnesota jury found Chauvin guilty of murdering Floyd after he pressed his knee on Floyd’s neck for more than nine minutes — captured in a video that spurred a global awakening.

Nearly 1,000 miles from Minnesota, criminal justice experts say Colorado has set a bold example for the entire nation when it comes to impactful police reform.

A stack of legislative bills being placed in cubbies.
David Calvert / The Nevada Independent

With less than six weeks until the end of the 2021 legislative session, the general public can, once again, enter the Legislative Building in Carson City, albeit, with some hoops. KUNR's Political Editor, Paul Boger spoke with Morning Edition host Noah Glick about the latest from the Capital City.

Two stacks of paper booklets on a desk.
David Calvert / The Nevada Independent

Week six of the 2021 Nevada Legislature has come and gone, leaving lawmakers with the first major deadline of the session. KUNR’s political editor Paul Boger spoke with Morning Edition host Noah Glick to share what that means.

Updated 4:13 p.m. ET

Thousands of demonstrators braved sweltering temperatures in the nation's capital on Friday to demand an overhaul of the country's criminal justice system and push for racial equality.

The event, called the Commitment March, was held at the Lincoln Memorial, the same site where the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. called for those same reforms decades ago in his iconic "I Have a Dream" speech.

A man holds a sign that says, "Blue Lives Matter."
David Calvert / Nevada Independent

Lawmakers in Nevada are rolling back protections granted to law enforcement officers under investigation. The protections were just put into place last year. Law enforcement agencies and progressive groups both denounced the bill. 

A sign on the ground that says, "Ban Chokeholds," covered in spotted shade from a tree.
Ty C. O’Neil / This Is Reno / Nevada News

Black Lives Matter protests have erupted across the country, and in Nevada, and with them, demands for police reform. In response, lawmakers in Nevada have approved a bill meant to change how law enforcement officers in the state handle arrests, but activists say there’s more to be done.

A group of people having a virtual meeting.
Screenshot / NSHE via BlueJeans

Conversations about police brutality and systemic racism are continuing after the killing of George Floyd. The Nevada System of Higher Education is responding by making modifications to its campus policing and having conversations about discrimination on university campuses. During a NSHE town hall on these matters, Nevada Attorney General Aaron Ford said the time for action is now.

Red and blue lights flashing on top of a police car.
AARON ANDERER / FLICKR CREATIVE COMMONS

The City of Reno held a virtual town hall on June 22 with top county law enforcement officials to discuss a study on policing in Washoe County. The study was completed back in 2018 by the Guinn Center, a nonprofit, bipartisan organization. Town hall participants examined what work has been done to improve community policing since the study was released, along with what work remains to be done. KUNR’s Jayden Perez spoke with Nancy Brune, executive director of the Guinn Center, to learn more.

Two people sitting across from each other in front of a curtain. A sign language interpreter is on a screen to the top left.
Screenshot / City of Reno Via YouTube

Top law enforcement officials in Washoe County spoke during a town hall on Monday, June 22, about some of the steps their agencies are looking at to improve community policing as the national discussion on law enforcement reform continues to unfold.

Sirens atop law enforcement vehicle
Aaron Anderer / Flickr Creative Commons

As thousands are demonstrating against a pattern of police brutality toward Black people in the U.S., Congress is working to find legislative solutions to reform law enforcement.

Catherine Cortez Masto is one of the Democratic senators from Nevada and the former state attorney general. She spoke with KUNR’s Bree Zender on Wednesday about what can be done on the federal level.

Updated at 2:20 p.m. ET

President Trump signed an executive order on Tuesday encouraging police departments to improve training — a step critics say falls short of what is needed to curb police officers' use of force against nonwhites.

The order comes as the president faces tremendous pressure to take action following the killing of George Floyd at the hands of police last month.