Energy and Environment | KUNR

Energy and Environment

Cardboard boxes crammed together for trash disposal.
Jon Moore / Unsplash

The average Nevadan produces nearly 8 pounds of garbage per person every day. That's nearly twice the national average, according to a new report form the American Society of Civil Engineers, or ASCE. 

An aerial shot of the Camp Fire in Paradise, California.
NASA

A recent climate change report finds wildfires will only grow more destructive and longer lasting. In fact wildfires could burn up to six times more forest area annually by 2050 in parts of the U.S. Even before this climate report, UNR's Graham Kent has been working on expanding the footprint of his Alert Wildfire System to tackle this rapidly growing problem.

Pyramid Lake
Ken Lund / Flickr

Washoe County has proposed a public lands bill that could open up 180,000 acres of federal land north of Reno and Sparks for private sale. The goal is to free up land for developing affordable housing and create a source of revenue for the county.

Courtesy Kirk Peterson / Friends of Nevada Wilderness

Washoe County drafted a resolution that would remove more than 350,000 acres from wilderness study areas. If passed, then the approximate 550 square miles would revert to Bureau of Land Management open space. That would open up the land for various potential activities, such as mining and energy transmission. 

Some environmental groups are concerned that key habitat and archeological sites would be put at risk. KUNR's Kathleen Masterson reports. 

Michelle Billman

When farmers first purchase water rights, they typically reserve them for a certain time of the year based on historical predictions of when the most water will flow, but the runoff is frequently coming earlier because of climate change. 

Lou Manna

1 Million Cups is seeking to strengthen Nevada's startup community by giving entrepreneurs a chance to share their ideas. Our contributor Kaleb Roedel of the Northern Nevada Business View Reports.

Paul Boger

2017 was the hottest year on record for most of Northern Nevada. And while the warmer weather has created complications across the region, nowhere may be as impacted as Lake Tahoe. The delicate ecosystem of the continent’s largest alpine lake has been under assault for decades from invasive species, algae growth and decreasing clarity. But area leaders are now concerned that wildfires may pose an even greater threat to the lake.

Bree Zender

When you think of the sources behind carbon dioxide emissions, you might think of cars and factories. But in the rural mountains of the Eastern Sierra, University of Nevada, Reno researchers are finding that much of the CO2 emissions come from an unlikely place: dried up meadows. KUNR's Bree Zender reports. 

A worker stands on the side of the road above Emerald Bay holding machinery.
Caltrans

Environmental damage caused by an engineering company has delayed a multimillion-dollar project in the Emerald Bay area. It has also prompted an investigation by the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency, or TRPA. Our contributor Kaleb Roedel of the Northern Nevada Business View has the details.

 

 

image of fly geyser
Joey Lovato

The infamous Fly Geyser, situated on the private land north of Gerlach, has been closed to the public for nearly two decades. But now, the land's new owners – the Burning Man Project – are opening the geyser for public viewing. Reporters Joey Lovato and Bree Zender got a rare chance to check out the Geyser. Take a virtual road trip to see the landmark that has been popular for nature photographers but rarely seen by the public.

image of fly geyser
Joey Lovato

The infamous Fly Geyser, situated on private land north of Gerlach, has been closed to the public for nearly two decades. But now, the land's new owner – the Burning Man Project – is opening the geyser for public viewing. Reno Public Radio's Bree Zender took a trip southwest of the Black Rock Desert, to find out more about it. 

Using Goats To Fight Invasive Species

Feb 28, 2018
Paul Boger

Whether it's hoary cress, with its tiny white flowers and hairy leaves, or Scotch thistle, a plant with spiny wings that can grow up to 12 feet tall, Nevada has a problem with noxious weeds. But some ranchers may have found a way to effectively deal with the invasive species: goats. Our reporter Paul Boger went out into the field to learn more.

Noah Glick

In December, snowpack in the Sierra was below normal levels, warning some water experts of a drought. Since then, a few storms have passed. Reno Public Radio's Bree Zender checks in again with Jeff Anderson, a hydrologist from the Natural Resources Conservation Service about where the snowpack levels are today, and how that could affect water flow.


BLACK ROCK SOLAR, FLICKR, HTTPS://CREATIVECOMMONS.ORG/LICENSES/BY/2.0/
Holly Hutchings

The Carson Valley just hosted its Eagles and Agriculture event for the sixteenth year, helping passers-by see eagles and other birds that populate the area in the winter months. Holly Hutchings reports.

Andy Wraithmell / Public Domain

As northern Nevada continues to grow and expand its urban core, one local scientist is looking to see what impacts that could have on wildlife.

(left to right): Dilek Uz, Stephen Brown, Kimberly Robbins and Frances Moore discuss the economic impacts of climate change during UNR's Global Climate Change Summit, Saturday September 23.
Noah Glick

Scientists and community leaders gathered at the University of Nevada, Reno to discuss the impacts of climate change—on the environment and the economy.

Western Pond Turtles have been around Nevada for 150 years. Scientists say the species can be a good indicator of ecosystem health, because they use rivers, ponds and land systems.
Noah Glick

The Western Pond Turtle has been a part of the Carson Valley since at least the 1860s. Yet, scientists know very little about the population in Nevada—and what it can tell us about overall ecosystem health.

Hunters, fishermen and other sportsmen had high expectations when Ryan Zinke was tapped to be President Trump's interior secretary, in part because of his promise to bring a balanced, Teddy Roosevelt-style vision to managing public lands.

But the former Republican congressman from Montana is now the target of a critical ad campaign by one of those groups, a symptom of eroding support among a deep-pocketed faction that has become increasingly influential.

Noah Glick

The annual Lake Tahoe Summit brings together elected representatives from Nevada and California to discuss the future of the basin.

This year, officials focused on the impact of climate change and urban development on its famed clarity.

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