Jacob Solis | KUNR

Jacob Solis

Contributor And Media Partner

Before joining The Nevada Independent, Jacob interned for Nevada Public Radio, where he covered the 2017 legislative session, and Reno Public Radio, where he was on general assignment covering everything from immigration to traffic to the Northern Nevada housing crunch. During that time, he also worked for UNR's student paper, The Nevada Sagebrush, serving as editor-in-chief from 2016 to 2018.

Jacob graduated magna cum laude from UNR in May 2018 with a B.A. in journalism and a minor in political science. He also received the Outstanding Electronic Media Student award from the Reynolds School of Journalism and was inducted into Kappa Tau Alpha, the national journalism honor society. Earlier in the year, he received a second place award from the Associated Press Television and Radio Association for his reporting on the reverberations of 1 October at UNR, where more than a third of students call Las Vegas home. Jacob was also a member of the 2018 KUNR Public Radio team that won a regional Murrow award for Priced Out, an investigative series on affordable housing.

Born and raised in Henderson, Nev., Jacob spends his spare time watching sports, catching up on reading, or playing a video game or two.

Ways to Connect

Episode 8 - Motels and Dorms

In this episode, Joey has a guest co-host reporter Jacob Solis. You'll hear from Paul Boger as he talks about daily motels and the impact they are having on the affordable housing problem in the area. Later on in the episode, Jacob has a story about the city's plans to build dorm-style living in Reno, and he wraps up with a debrief with Joey.

The Sage Street site.
Jacob Solis

Among the people hit hardest by Reno's affordable housing crunch are the city's lowest income residents. Rising rents are often pushing people out of apartments or motels and onto to the street. But now, in downtown Reno, there's a project to create a new safety net.  

BONUS - Pets and Housing

We've got a special bonus episode of the podcast this week. Joey is joined by a special cohost, Jacob Solis. First, we will hear a story from Bree Zender about pets and how they impact renters. Then Jacob talks with the SPCA to find out more about how the housing crunch is impacting pet owners and pet adoptions.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) speaks at an event
Jacob Solis

On the same day President Donald Trump visited Las Vegas for the state Republican convention, Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren headlined the Democratic event in Reno. Her appearance comes at a crucial time for state Democrats who have to decide just how progressive they want to be in the run-up to this November's general election. 

It's primary season again, and while much of the attention is focused on top-of-the ticket races, especially U.S. senator and governor, there's still a fight to control Nevada's state legislature.

There are 42 seats in Nevada's Assembly, and just like the U.S. House of Representatives, each and every seat is up for grabs in every election cycle. 

Photo of high school lockers.
Alexa Ard

The Washoe County school board has had its fair share of controversy, with everything from budget woes to serious allegations against individual members. And now, three seats on the board are up for grabs. Our reporter Jacob Solis sat down with Sam Gross, education reporter for the Reno Gazette Journal, to find out more. 

Krysta Scripter

For years after the recession, there were zero new homes built in Fernley, which was dubbed the foreclosure capital of the US. In 2017, there were more than 200. It's part of a larger trend as people start to look outside of Reno/Sparks for a place they can afford to live. Our reporter Jacob Solis spoke to an official in Fernley to find out more.

A leasing sign near UNR
Jacob Solis

In the last few years, the University of Nevada, Reno, saw a spike in enrollment even as nationwide numbers decline. But with that increase in students comes another problem; where are they all supposed to live? And as Reno Public Radio's Jacob Solis reports, the answer is not so simple.

A Flirtey drone flies during a test
Flirtey/CC 3.0

Reno will soon see the use of commercial drones to deliver medical devices. The biggest little city will take part in a nationwide pilot program meant to test out the use of commercial drones -- think drones delivering packages. 

This year's primary elections are just around the corner, and among the seats up for grabs are all the top jobs inside the state's executive branch. Reno Public Radio's Paul Boger sat down with our reporter Jacob Solis to find out how those races are shaping up. 

Jacob Solis

Students across the nation participated in a national school walkout Wednesday. The protests were aimed at pressing lawmakers to take action against gun violence in the wake of the mass shooting at a school in Florida last month that killed 17 students and teachers. Our reporter Paul Boger checked in with the students at Earl Wooster High School in Reno.

Just after 10 o'clock in the morning, at least two hundred students from Wooster High gathered in the entryway of the U.S. Post Office on Vassar Street in Reno.

Public Domain

New comments from Senator Dean Heller seem to imply the U.S. Supreme Court could have a vacancy as soon as this summer.

In a Q and A with the J. Reuben Clark Law Society in Las Vegas last week, Heller made a number of bold claims. Among them, a prediction that Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy will retire by early summer.

"That being the case, the Republicans are going to have an opportunity to put another supreme court justice in place, which I'm hoping will get our base motivated because right now they're not motivated."

Michelle Matus

 

Sales tax revenues in Nevada are up, partly thanks to recreational pot. We sat down with Bill Anderson, executive director of the Nevada Department of Taxation, to break it all down.

So, the latest revenue numbers are in, and December marked the 90th straight month the state has seen growth in sales tax revenues. What does that mean, both for the state and for its general fund?

Jacob Solis

 

For the first time in 14 years, Washoe County is going to have new voting machines.

 

The new machines are large tablets, about two feet tall and one foot wide. At a price of $4.2 million dollars for the whole system, the tablets will provide a number of new accessibility and usability improvements.

Heather Carmen is the Assistant Registrar of Voters for Washoe County.

 

Jacob Solis

 

A bill from Senator Dean Heller is looking to curb gang violence, in part, by making it easier to deport known gang members or immigrants associated with gangs, but not everyone is so sure it's the right move. Reno Public Radio's Jacob Solis spoke to a law professor at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas to find out more.

And a warning, this interview does contain some graphic details.

 

 

In his memoir Mulligan’s Wake, author Dave Mulligan recounts some of his outlandish adventures as a young adult following the death of his father. Many of the stories are littered with humor and absurd situations, but at the heart of his writing is an honest look at one man's attempt to grieve for his deceased father in an unconventional way.

Perhaps the most unbelievable story took place decades ago when Mulligan paid a late night visit to Marineland in Palos Verdes, California, which has since closed.

Famartin via Wikimedia Commons

 

On Monday, President Donald Trump finally unveiled his long awaited infrastructure plan. It includes $200 billion in new funding, but under the proposed incentive structure, only 20 percent of any given project can be funded by the federal government.

Alexa Ard

 In September, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos announced major changes to how colleges and universities handle sexual assault. But long-term changes remain unclear, even three months after the announcement. Our news director Michelle Billman sat down with reporter Jacob Solis to sort this all out.

Alexa Ard

 

 

When Education Secretary Betsy DeVos recently moved to undo an Obama-era expansion of Title IX enforcement, she left the world of higher education with a lot of questions. The old rules were meant to give more protections to victims of sexual assault on college campuses. DeVos says they go too far and deny those accused of assault due process. But at the University of Nevada, Reno, the people who work with sexual assault victims aren’t so sure.

 

 

Pages