Noah Glick

Nevada Reporter

Growing up in Indiana, Noah Glick is a Westerner at heart. As a reporter in Reno, Nevada, he covers issues affecting the Mountain West, including climate change, economics, water rights, energy and culture.

Outside of work, you might catch him outside hiking, camping or playing inline hockey.

American Public Power Association / Unsplash

New legislation that aims to significantly increase renewable energy utility projects on public lands is receiving strong bipartisan support.

Members of the House Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources were united in support of the Public Land Renewable Energy Development Act.

Vincent van Zalinge / Unsplash

Proposed legislation in the Senate aims to reduce conflict between humans and predatory wildlife, with a $100,000 cash prize.

Wyoming Senator John Barrasso introduced the bill. The $100,000 Theodore Roosevelt Genius Prize would be awarded to the winner of an annual competition. The goal is to develop new or better nonlethal methods of reducing human-predator conflicts.

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

A solar project in our region is opening up conversations around building wildlife protection into renewable energy infrastructure.

Washington State Department of Natural Resources / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

The Bureau of Land Management is proposing 11,000 miles of fuel breaks throughout our region to help combat the spread of wildfires.

RedBoy [Matt] / CC BY-ND 2.0

On Tuesday, three of our region's governors joined 21 others to support a strong national standard for clean cars, called the "Nation's Clean Car Promise."

The agreement has three goals: reduce greenhouse gases, create regulatory certainty and preserve jobs in the auto sector.

Boise State Public Radio / Mountain West News Bureau

Any day now, the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals will rule on the case of Adree Edmo. She’s a transgender woman currently in prison in Idaho. She sued the state for sex reassignment surgery—and won.

The state appealed. And now the 9th Circuit’s decision on her case could have implications not only for her but for transgender inmates across the West and potentially the nation.

Mykl Roventine / CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

Nevada Democrats will have more options when participating in the state's first-in-the-West caucus next February. That's because party leaders are allowing people to vote early and by phone.

Helix

Genetics can tell us a lot about ourselves, from where we come from to our risk of developing disease. In Nevada, researchers are collecting this personal information in the largest health study of its kind in the world.

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

As we head into the dog days of summer, 2019 is projected to be among the top five hottest years on record. That's according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

simianwolverine / Licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0

Parks across our region are seeing dramatic increases in visitation. Land managers are trying to balance visitor experience with conservation, including at the popular Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area, just west of Las Vegas, Nevada.

Richie Bedarski / Friends of Nevada Wilderness

Most people in the United States can't see a full night sky that's not affected by light pollution. But, in a remote corner of Nevada, the Milky Way Galaxy shines bright enough at night to cast a shadow.

The area is known as Massacre Rim and it was recently designated as a Dark Sky Sanctuary.

Headwaters Economics

The Mountain West is home to huge swaths of public land. A new web-based tool is now showing people exactly where that land is and which agency is managing it.

World Economic Forum

Robots and other automated machines will work more hours than humans by 2025.

That's according to the World Economic Forum. And the Mountain West is particularly vulnerable.

Noah Glick / KUNR

Driving in the Mountain West can sometimes be a little hairy. Curvy mountain roads with steep inclines and declines, plus heavy snow and hail in the winter can make roads dangerous. Now, imagine doing it in an 80-foot long, 80,000-pound eighteen-wheeler. You're going to need more than Drivers' Ed.

Timo Wagner / Unsplash

Business leaders are seeing climate change as a major risk to their bottom line. And according to a new report, more companies are planning for it.

Worldwide, 72 percent of businesses are preparing for climate risks as part of their overall business strategy. That's true here in the U.S., but that number drops down to 65 percent.

Headwaters Economics

A recent study reports people are more likely to move to recreation-based economies, which can have big implications throughout the Mountain West.

The non-profit research group Headwaters Economics concluded that the recreation economy might be the key to keeping residents in rural counties - and attracting new ones.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

In a strong bipartisan message, the Nevada legislature says it will not welcome a proposed expansion of a U.S. Air Force training range into the state's Desert National Wildlife Refuge.

The Air Force is asking Congress to redesignate large swaths of public land for military testing and training. The majority of that request - 227,000 acres - lie within the Desert National Wildlife Refuge in southern Nevada.

Victor Bobier / National Popular Vote

Nevada Democratic Governor Steve Sisolak has vetoed a bill that would pledge the state's six electoral votes for President to the winner of the national popular vote.

The move was the governor's first veto in his first legislative session. The bill, Assembly Bill 186, would have put Nevada into a compact with 14 other states and the District of Columbia. Under the compact, electoral votes go to the winner of the national popular vote, instead of the candidate who wins their state.

Department of Energy

It's been more than thirty years since Yucca Mountain in Nevada was picked as the nation's nuclear waste site, and the state has been fighting the project ever since. Under President Obama, it got its wish.

Fast forward to the Trump administration, and that long-running debate is back on the table.

National Park Service

You may have heard of a mysterious 137-year-old Winchester rifle that was discovered in Nevada's Great Basin National Park a few years ago. It sparked worldwide interest at the time. Now, it's found a permanent home.

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