fire prevention

University of Nevada, Reno Seismological Laboratory

More than 100 fires burned through the Tahoe basin and Truckee Meadows this year, including the recent Little Valley Fire.

But as Reno Public Radio’s Noah Glick reports, a network of cameras is helping to reduce the impact and damage caused by these blazes.

As the Hot Pot Fire near Battle Mountain and Winnemucca gained momentum over the summer, crews were able to get much needed air resources because of video evidence showing a rapid growth of the blaze.

University of Nevada, Reno

The Hot Pot fire has burned nearly two hundred square miles of rural land near Battle Mountain. One tool area fire crews have been using is a new live-stream remote camera system.

U.S. Forest Service, Carson Ranger District

The Eastern Sierras saw a wet winter this year, leaving grasses and other fire fuels on the ground. Now foresters are looking at sheep to help solve this issue.

Reno Public Radio’s Noah Glick sat down with Anna Belle Monti, fuels forester for the U.S. Forest Service to learn more.

NG: Can you just tell me a little bit about what a fuels forester does?

Desert Research Insitute

The Desert Research Institute recently unveiled its new Wildland Fire Science Center, a concept that brings together scientists from various disciplines to combat wildfires. As wildfire season approaches, Reno Public Radio's Noah Glick chatted with the center's new director, Hans Moosmüller.

NG: This is not a physical, research center. So what is this?

The cost of fighting wildfires has more than doubled in the last two decades in the country, according to the federal government. That shift could be serious for Nevada.

To cover the increased expenses, states have had to engage in “fire borrowing,” which means moving federal funds from fire prevention to fighting them instead.