Immigration

Una mujer abriendo una puerta para entrar en un edificio.
Jeff Scheid / The Nevada Independent

Ponerse cubrebocas, usar su propio bolígrafo, ceremonias más cortas, entrevistas por video y número limitado de visitantes, son algunos de los nuevos protocolos que deberán seguir quienes necesiten hacer trámites ante el Servicio de Ciudadanía e Inmigración de los Estados Unidos (USCIS) a partir de este 4 de junio.

Una mujer sentada en una sala con varias sillas.
Jeff Scheid / The Nevada Independent

Cierres de negocios no esenciales y otras estrictas medidas sanitarias implementadas para enfrentar al COVID-19 han tenido efectos en todas las áreas, incluyendo el sistema migratorio de los Estados Unidos.

Amaka Ozobia sitting in a conference room.
Daniel Clark / The Nevada Independent

Lee en español.

Amaka Ozobia’s parents came to the United States from Nigeria after fleeing the Biafran War, a conflict blamed for about 100,000 military casualties and as many as two million starvation deaths in the late 1960s.

That history — and her family’s own challenges adjusting to American life as immigrants — has formed a career that included working as an asylum officer, serving the children of migrant farmworkers as an Americorps volunteer and becoming an immigration attorney for the refugee-focused Church World Service. Ozobia is now settling in to her latest role on that trajectory — directing Nevada’s Office for New Americans.

Amaka Ozobia esta sentada en una sala de conferencias.
Daniel Clark / The Nevada Independent

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Los padres de Amaka Ozobia llegaron a los Estados Unidos de Nigeria después de vivir la Guerra de Biafra, conflicto que generó 100,000 bajas militares y 2 millones de muertos por hambruna a finales de los 60’s.

Malachi Brooks / Unsplash

Immigrants make up more than ten percent of the population in our region. And according to a report, that can provide big economic benefits.

Last month, the Trump administration said it would start deporting gravely ill immigrants here temporarily for medical care. This week, it backtracked a little. But 20 Attorneys General sent a letter to the administration saying they’re not satisfied. 

About 100 people attended vigil. Tania Leal showed up with her husband and her 7-year-old son [pictured]. He held a sign that read, “Families belong together” and listened to each speaker attentively. Leal says its important for him to understand
Stephanie Serrano / KUNR Public Radio

Community members are reacting to the current conditions at migrant detention centers at the Southern border. KUNR’s Stephanie Serrano spoke with some locals who say the time to take a stand is now.

Stephanie Serrano

Immigration and Customs Enforcement, or ICE, is preparing raids against undocumented migrants across the country this weekend. This has local residents in the Latinx community scared. KUNR's Stephanie Serrano has more.

Woman smiles and hugs pillow.
Karina Gonzalez

Escucha y lee en español

Temporary Protected Status, or TPS, is designated by the Department of Homeland Security. It allows people from various countries to live in the U.S. as a temporary “safe haven.” In late 2017, the Trump Administration announced it would terminate the program for four countries; however, in October, a federal judge in California put those plans on hold until there is further review by the courts. KUNR Reporter Karina Gonzalez visited a TPS holder from Nicaragua, whose status was originally set to terminate Saturday.

Man sits and smiles
Karina Gonzalez

President Trump recently announced plans to end birthright citizenship, which grants citizenship to any child born on U.S. soil, including children of undocumented immigrants. KUNR’s Karina Gonzalez recently sat down with BuzzFeed News reporter, Adolfo Flores, to talk about immigration issues including the migrant caravan.

Dark hotel hallway
Pexels: Tim Savage

Escucha y lee en español

Tu Casa Latina is a nonprofit organization that helps undocumented individuals who are victims of crime, such as domestic violence or sexual assault. The organization hosted an event this week about the sexual abuse of immigrant women who work the night shift. KUNR's Karina Gonzalez reports.

Dancers from local dance company Pueblo Nuevo prefrom on Fiesta on Wells.
Karina Gonzalez

Reno residents were immersed in community celebrations honoring Hispanic Heritage Month over the weekend. One event highlighted a corridor of the city that's becoming known as a cultural melting pot. KUNR’s Stephanie Serrano reports.

Victor Hugo Manuel Alcantara con recuerdos de sus años creciendo en los EE.UU. Foto cortesía de Guillermo Bautista.
Guillermo Bautista

Listen to and read this story in English. 

Muchas veces, la narrativa sobre la deportación termina cuando una persona indocumentada es detenida y deportada. También hay personas sin papeles llamadas retornadas, que aunque no son deportadas, deciden regresar a su país de origen.

Business Owners Protected By DACA Still In Limbo

Sep 13, 2018
Karina Gonzalez

Escucha y lee en español

According to the latest data from U.S. Immigration Services, there are more than 2,500 DACA recipients living in Northern and rural Nevada. Since its inception, the program has shielded recipients from deportation. But over the past year, the undocumented individuals who were brought to the U.S. as children have been living in legislative limbo after the Trump Administration rescinded the program. Yet some are doing their best to move forward despite the uncertainty, such as those who have started their own businesses. KUNR’s Karina Gonzalez has the story.

From Nevada To Mexico: Son Follows Deported Father

Sep 4, 2018
Victor Hugo Manuel Alcantara holds momentos from his years growing up in the U.S.
Guillermo Bautista

Escucha y lee esta historia en español. 

The narrative about deportation often ends once someone who is undocumented is detained and deported. There are also those without papers called returnees, who, while not deported, decide to return to their country of origin.

KUNR reporter Natalie Van Hoozer has the story of a young man who left Las Vegas to follow his deported father to Mexico. 

Manifestantes sientan en el medio de la calle.
Karina Gonzalez

Read and listen in Spanish here 

Attorney General Jeff Sessions visited Reno Monday morning to speak at a conference for the National Association of School Resource Officers at the Peppermill Resort. Roughly 200 people gathered outside to protest Sessions and President Donald Trump’s immigration policies. Reno Public Radio’s Karina Gonzalez has the story.

Jeff Sessions habla en el escenario.
Krysta Scripter

Attorney General Jeff Sessions spoke Monday at the Peppermill Resort Spa Casino in Reno to over 1,000 school resource officers at a national school safety conference. As KUNR's Bree Zender reports, Sessions briefly focused on school safety, but spent much of his speech on issues surrounding undocumented immigrants.

Construction workers on site of an apartment complex being constructed for people 55 years of age and older.
Noah Glick

For our series, Priced Out: The Housing Crunch, our reporters have been speaking to several developers. And some have pointed out one potential reason for rising housing costs: immigration enforcement.

Imágen del mapa: G.E. Bullard, https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/ Texto y diseño gráfico: Natalie Van Hoozer
Natalie Van Hoozer

Listen to and read this story in English. 

En el candente debate nacional sobre inmigración usualmente surge la pregunta de ¿por qué los inmigrantes indocumentados no ingresan legalmente a los Estados Unidos?

Nuestra reportera Natalie Van Hoozer ha estado investigando el tema y descubrió que no es tan simple. Se reunió con Michelle Billman, nuestra Directora de Noticias, para analizar el proceso de obtención de una visa.

What Exactly Is 'Chain Migration?'

Apr 18, 2018
Camille Stuyvesant

President Donald Trump is calling for an end to “chain migration” along with tighter legal immigration control, but what exactly does that term mean? The misconception is that any immigrant can bring as many family members as they would like when they come to the United States. In actuality, the process is much lengthier, in some cases taking up to 23 years, and is limited to certain family members. Our reporter, Camille Stuyvesant spoke with immigration attorney Sylvia Ontaneda-Bernales to break down 'chain migration.'

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