Burning Man | KUNR

Burning Man

An image of the Nevada Legislature building
Jana Sayson / KUNR Public Radio

Here are your local morning news headlines for Friday, Apr. 16, 2021.

An image of the Martis Trail in Truckee during the winter.
Amy Westervelt / KUNR Public Radio

Here are your local news headlines for the morning of Friday, Apr. 2, 2021.

An image of a sign that says "Welcome to Elko" surrounded by fast food signs.
Georgio / Creative Commons, CC BY 2.0

Here are your local news headlines for the morning of Friday, Mar. 26, 2021.

People clinging on a large metal sculpture of a gramophone. The sculpture is sitting on the white dust of the playa with a bright blue sky overhead.
Paul Boger

If this was a normal year, right now, thousands of people would be flocking to the middle of the northern Nevada desert to watch “The Man” burn. But it’s not a normal year, and this year’s Burning Man counterculture outdoor festival has been canceled along with many, many live events across the region. That’s taking its toll on the arts, the community and the economy. 

A large pile of rubbish sits only a stone's throw away from a sign that says "No Dumping Allowed."
Paul Boger / KUNR Public Radio

Love it or hate it, Burning Man has become an institution in Northern Nevada. The annual counter-culture festival in the Black Rock Desert draws tens of thousands of tourists every year, bolstering the area's economy and arts scene. However, critics are concerned about the amount of trash and refuse left behind. KUNR's Paul Boger took a look around town to see the trash post-burn.

A man in a black shirt stands with his arms crossed.
Lucia Starbuck

The annual Burning Man festival is underway this week; however, the process of getting the artwork ready has been going on for months. KUNR’s Lucia Starbuck spoke with one artist before he set out for the playa.

 Steve Benjamin mayor of Columbia, South Carolina speaks about his investments during his presidency with the U.S Confernece of Mayors .
Stephanie Serrano

A group of mayors from across the country are looking to Reno as an example of how arts and culture can power local economies. KUNR's Stephanie Serrano has more.

Holly Hutchings

Burning Man may be held in the Nevada desert, but its interest and appeal has a much wider reach. Visitors come from all over the world to attend the week-long festival, and even more people who don't attend have their curiosity piqued by tales from the playa. Trevor Hughes, Reporter for USA Today, has captured stories there for three years and stopped by our studio to talk to our arts reporter, Holly Hutchings before he headed up for burn number four.

Lessons From The Playa: Burning Man Founder Michael Mikel

Aug 28, 2018
Holly Hutchings

Michael Mikel is a co-founder of Burning Man, the international anti-establishment festival in the desert, and has been involved since 1988. He still attends and has a small camp on the outskirts of the playa, where he says it feels more like the Burning Man of the early days; fewer people and a clear view of the expansive desert canvas. Ideas of the festival’s future come more freely to him there. He says they’ve developed systems that allow the organization to change and live on long after he and the other originators are gone. Our reporter Holly Hutchings sat down with Mikel to talk Burning Man.

From Reno To The Playa: A "Bigger, Crazier" Man Base

Aug 24, 2018
By BLM Nevada (Burning Man 2015) via Wikimedia Commons

Since its inception, the counterculture festival known as Burning Man has been a utopia for art and artists. Massive installations color the Black Rock Desert, even down to the very foundation on which the iconic “Man” stands. Our reporter Holly Hutchings caught up with the designer of the base to see what it’s all about.

Reno Artist Hopes Burning Man Will Propel Career

Aug 22, 2018
Holly Hutchings

Sculpture artist Peter Hazel is heading to Burning Man for his sixth time this year. And, he hopes the massive jellyfish creation he’s crafted for the dusty artistic showcase will catapult his craft to new levels. Our reporter Holly Hutchings caught up with Hazel where he works at Artech, a shared workspace in Reno. 

Reno's Mini Playa

Jul 26, 2018
A smiling man wearing a black cut-off shirt sitting comfortably in a dimly lit roo. A lamp is on behind him and poofy skirts hang from the wall.
Taylor Burner

For a select few, Burning Man doesn’t end after the burning of the wooden effigy. At the Morris Burner Hostel in Reno, people live the Burning Man lifestyle 365 days a year. The hostel hosts up to 18 full-time residents in art-themed rooms. Students at the Reynolds School of Journalism profiled one those tenants, a formerly homeless man who is now employed as a carpenter for Burning Man’s most iconic artwork, the Man.

image of fly geyser
Joey Lovato

The infamous Fly Geyser, situated on the private land north of Gerlach, has been closed to the public for nearly two decades. But now, the land's new owners – the Burning Man Project – are opening the geyser for public viewing. Reporters Joey Lovato and Bree Zender got a rare chance to check out the Geyser. Take a virtual road trip to see the landmark that has been popular for nature photographers but rarely seen by the public.

image of fly geyser
Joey Lovato

The infamous Fly Geyser, situated on private land north of Gerlach, has been closed to the public for nearly two decades. But now, the land's new owner – the Burning Man Project – is opening the geyser for public viewing. Reno Public Radio's Bree Zender took a trip southwest of the Black Rock Desert, to find out more about it. 

Paul Boger

Over the past several years, Burning Man as an event has faced criticism. Some believe that the festival has moved too far beyond its roots as a place for artists to display their work.  Or where members of the “counterculture” can find support. They argue that it’s become too corporate, a playground for the rich. Others, though, feel like the event is moving in a more sustainable direction.

Paul Boger

The art that's out on the playa in Black Rock City is an integral part of Burning Man. This year, artists from around the world have constructed pieces that run the gamut from large to small, including wood structures, paintings, and more. Our reporter Paul Boger spoke with Anabel Romero from Los Angeles who is part of a crew that has created a large wooden structure called Aluna as well as Harvey Branscomb of Colorado, who helped bring a piece called the Mammoth Art Car to Nevada.

Christopher Michel

People from around the globe will descend upon Northern Nevada this weekend to take part in one of the largest arts and cultural events in the country -- Burning Man.

Located about two hours north of Reno in the Black Rock Desert, the festival has become one of the largest cultural events in the nation. And this year it's expected to draw an estimated 70,000 people to Northern Nevada. But what is the impact of the event, and what can we expect to see this year?

Reno Public Radio reached out to the Reno Gazette Journal 's Burning Man Reporter Jenny Kane to get the details

Kaitlin Godbey / Travel Nevada

A 200-mile trail from Reno to Gerlach is being proposed to highlight Washoe County’s cultural, historic, and artistic elements. With $75,000 in grant funds from the the National Endowment for the Arts, Washoe County, working with Burning Man, envisions the trail to pass through Reno-Sparks, small towns, and tribal lands into Gerlach.

Joe Sale Photography

Reno is becoming the new home for a large, so-called Space Whale sculpture. Our News Director Michelle Billman chatted with contributor Bob Conrad of ThisisReno to learn more.

The sculpture is a life-size representation of a humpback whale mother and her calf. There were roughly 1,700 individual glass panels installed in this ambitious piece of public art.

The project is paid for out of the city’s portion of room tax funds that go into the city’s arts budget. 

ThisisReno.com

More Burning Man art is coming to the Biggest Little City. Our contributor Bob Conrad of ThisisReno spoke with two of the artists contributing to the new Playa Art Park, which recently held it’s opening reception.

A drill is going through thin stainless steel to build a sculpture called Imago. The artist is Kirsten Berg, who lives part of the year in Southeast Asia but comes to Reno each year for Burning Man.

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