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casinos

Multiple tanks with oxygen nozzles coming out of them. The tanks are on top of a counter with several people seated or standing around it.
Amanda Kelso / Flickr Creative Commons

Here’s the latest business news from around Northern Nevada, with Business Beat from the Northern Nevada Business Weekly.

The Mathewson-IGT Knowledge Center on the UNR Campus.
Lucia Starbuck / KUNR Public Radio

Here are the local news headlines for the morning of Friday, Aug. 27, 2021.

An image of snow showshoers in Yellowstone National Park.
Courtesy / Yellowstone National Park

Here are your local news headlines for the morning of Friday, June 25, 2021.

Two people walk past a wall of framed photos in the Nevada Legislature.
David Calvert / The Nevada Independent

There are only four days left in Nevada's 81st legislative session, and lawmakers are scrambling to get bills out of the door and onto the governor's desk. That includes appropriating billions in state dollars to fund the government over the next two years. To talk about that, KUNR Morning Edition host Noah Glick spoke with political editor Paul Boger.

Nicole Cannizzaro is wearing a face mask and looking away from the camera.
David Calvert / The Nevada Independent

Nevada lawmakers are taking up a last-minute effort to give casinos greater authority to ban firearms from their properties.

Michelle Matus / KUNR Public Radio

Here are your local news headlines for the morning of Monday, Apr. 5, 2021.

Un letrero colocado en la puerta del casino que dice "leer antes de entrar".
Benjamin Payne

Read in English.

Los apostadores pudieron probar su suerte una vez más en Nevada, ya que los casinos en el estado abrieron sus puertas con una capacidad máxima del 50 por ciento este pasado viernes, 4 de junio. Pero como informa Benjamin Payne de KUNR, los trabajadores siguen preocupados por la seguridad debido a la pandemia de COVID-19.

Sign on casino door.
Ben Payne

Lee en español.

Gamblers can once again try their luck in Nevada, as casinos across the state begin reopening Thursday under 50% maximum occupancy, but as KUNR's Benjamin Payne reports, workers are concerned about safety. 

A casino in Reno.
Brian Bahouth of the Sierra Nevada Ally

The Nevada Gaming Control Board is making final regulatory preparations to reopen casinos as soon as June 4. Our contributor Brian Bahouth with the Sierra Nevada Ally reports. 

An image of the title page of the economic recovery plan, reading "Nevada United Roadmap To Recovery"
State of Nevada

Nevada Governor Steve Sisolak announced the lifting of some COVID-19 restrictions, as portions of the state begin to reopen.

KUNR’s senior reporter, Paul Boger, spoke with Noah Glick, who’s been following the updates, to learn what changes take effect today.

An image of the inside of the Westgate Resorts Superbook.
Westgate Resorts

The COVID-19 pandemic is now threatening the Tokyo 2020 Summer Olympics, following a number of high-profile sporting events that have already been postponed or canceled. These cancelations have some sportsbooks looking for different things to bet on.

Stevie Tavener said, "Finding different breathing patterns or different things we can do to stay present in the moment. Things are changing hourly, so we kind of just have to stay as present as possible and that's what I'm focusing on most."
Stephanie Serrano / KUNR

Many Nevadans working in the service industry, who have the opportunity to file for unemployment, are currently in the process of doing so after the mandated statewide closure of all non-essential businesses for 30 days. KUNR’s Stephanie Serrano spoke to two Reno locals who have been impacted.

An image of the Las Vegas strip with a storm cloud looming overhead.
Thomas Hawk / Flickr

The COVID-19 pandemic is forcing federal, state and local governments to take drastic measures. And in Nevada, Gov. Steve Sisolak did something never done before: he ordered all casinos in the state to shut down for 30 days.

An image of a basketball game with a large crowd.
University of Nevada, Reno

COVID-19 is halting sports events around the country. The National Basketball Association, the National Hockey League and Major League Soccer are all suspended. And March Madness is canceled.

That’s affecting one industry particularly hard: sports betting.

First Days In America: Casino Exec. Karen Goforth

Jul 11, 2019
Illustrated by Stephanie Serrano
Illustrated by Stephanie Serrano

Wanting to explore and see the world in her early twenties, Karen Goforth came to the United States from Melbourne, Australia about 40 years ago. When she arrived, she discovered more opportunities for women in the states. Today, she tells us her story for our series, “First Days in America.”

Courtsey of IGT

Virtual reality is potentially making its way onto the casino floors in Nevada. KUNR contributor Kaleb Roedel of the Northern Nevada Business View has the details.

A photo of a green casino gaming table with multicolored chips and a hand turning over an Ace card and a King card.
Unsplash

A New Jersey-based company has agreed to pay Nevada gaming regulators $150,000 for illegally approving a cash wagering system for casinos but never doing the required testing. Our contributor Kaleb Roedel of the Northern Nevada Business View has more. 

A large ballroom
Courtesy Peppermill Reno

With more casinos popping up across the country, Reno properties are chasing diverse types of non-gaming revenue. Our contributor Kaleb Roedel of the Northern Nevada Business Weekly has the story.

Nevada casinos have now reported three consecutive months when total win exceeded a billion dollars. Our contributor Kaleb Roedel of the Northern Nevada Business Weekly breaks down the numbers.

Special Collections Department, University of Nevada, Reno Libraries.

The casinos in the Reno-Tahoe area have long offered much more than just gambling, but the world of casino entertainment has changed quite a bit through the years. Historian Alicia Barber shines a spotlight on the golden era of casino showrooms in this episode of Time & Place.

Reno’s casinos started opening their own elegant nightclubs and dinner showrooms in the 1940s, and by the fifties, they were in fierce competition to book big-name entertainers to headline them, often for a week or two at a time. Lounge and opening acts could stay on even longer.

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