catherine cortez masto

Sirens atop law enforcement vehicle
Aaron Anderer / Flickr Creative Commons

As thousands are demonstrating against a pattern of police brutality toward Black people in the U.S., Congress is working to find legislative solutions to reform law enforcement.

Catherine Cortez Masto is one of the Democratic senators from Nevada and the former state attorney general. She spoke with KUNR’s Bree Zender on Wednesday about what can be done on the federal level.

A two-way road in the middle of a small town.
Farmation / Wikimedia Commons

The U.S. Congress is putting together another stimulus package — its fourth — in an effort to lighten the heavy effects of the novel coronavirus pandemic. Catherine Cortez Masto is one of Nevada’s senators. She spoke with KUNR’s Bree Zender about what’s in the works.

A microscopic picture of coronavirus
NIAID / Flickr/Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)

As many Nevadans face hardships ahead due to restrictions aimed at preventing the spread of the novel coronavirus, some are looking to the government for relief. Nevada U.S. Senator Catherine Cortez Masto has been involved in some of the decision-making regarding these federal relief packages. She spoke Friday with KUNR's Bree Zender.

Exterior del Centro de Procesamiento CoreCivic de Houston.
Patrick Feller / Flickr Creative Commons

Read in English.

Senadoras Demócratas de Nevada están pidiendo que se investigue un centro de detención del Servicio de Inmigración y Control de Aduanas (ICE) de gestión privada en Pahrump, después de reportes acerca de que un empleado participaba de manera activa en un sitio de Internet neonazi, y quería organizar un grupo supremacista blanco.

Exterior of the CoreCivic's Houston Processing Center.
Patrick Feller / Flickr Creative Commons

Lee en español.

Nevada’s Democratic senators are calling for an investigation into a privately run ICE detention center in Pahrump after reports that an employee was active on a neo-Nazi website and wanted to start a white supremacist group.

Pharmaceutical companies are facing scrutiny over the opioid crisis, but that hasn’t stopped them from giving millions of dollars to members of Congress, including many in the Mountain West.

Senators Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) and Catherine Cortez Masto (D-NV) speak with reporters, along with California Governor Gavin Newsom and Nevada Governor Steve Sisolak.
Bree Zender

During Tuesday’s annual Tahoe Summit, big political names from Nevada and California touted Lake Tahoe’s clarity, and efforts to keep it clear.

However, this year, the focus shifted to the forests beyond the shores. 

Joe Ravi - CC-BY-SA 3.0

Nevada’s U.S. Senators are sharing opposing opinions on the confirmation of Justice Brett Kavanaugh.

Noah Glick

The annual Lake Tahoe Summit brings together elected representatives from Nevada and California to discuss the future of the basin.

This year, officials focused on the impact of climate change and urban development on its famed clarity.

Paul Boger

President Donald Trump’s first 100 days in office have been contentious, to say the least. The Republican administration has sought to put the country back on a "winning track by reforming health care, immigration and taxes." However, Democrats like Nevada’s freshman Senator Catherine Cortez Masto have worked to keep the president’s legislative victories to a minimum.

Reno Public Radio’s political reporter, Paul Boger, sat down with Senator Cortez Masto to get the latest on those efforts, and what she sees as the best way to move America forward.

Cortez Masto Becomes First Latina Senator

Jan 3, 2017
catherinecortezmasto.com

Catherine Cortez Masto has been sworn in to the U.S. Senate, becoming Nevada's first female in the upper chamber of Congress and the nation's first Latina senator. Our News Director Michelle Billman reports. 

Catherin

Catherine Cortez Masto has won a nail biter Senate race and will keep the seat of retiring Sen. Harry Reid in Democratic hands. Our News Director Michelle Billman has the story.

The two-term former Nevada attorney general triumphed over three-term Republican Rep. Joe Heck. Political analyst Precious Hall says it came down to Heck's decision to drop his support for the now president-elect, Republican Donald Trump. Heck did so after video footage emerged of Trump discussing how he had groped and kissed multiple women.

Robert Petersen

Republican U.S. Representative and Senate-hopeful Joe Heck recently dropped his support for Presidential nominee Donald Trump. That decision was scrutinized during last week’s debate between Heck and his democratic opponent Catherine Cortez Masto.

Reno Public Radio’s Noah Glick has more.

Congressman Joe Heck was booed when he first told a crowd of supporters that he would not only not vote for Trump, but urged the candidate to step down.

During the only debate between the two candidates, hosted by KLAS in Las Vegas, Heck said the decision was personal.

Immigration reform has been a major issue during this year’s election season. And both candidates vying for retiring U.S. Senator Harry Reid’s seat addressed this issue during the only debate so far for that race.

Reno Public Radio’s Noah Glick reports.

Republican Joe Heck and Democrat Catherine Cortez Masto both say they support immigration reform—but specifics were hard to come by at the first and only debate between the two, hosted by KLAS-TV and Univision in Las Vegas.

Tsi-Tsi-Ki Félix with Univision was one of the moderators.

Some Republican politicians, including Congressman Joe Heck, are dropping their support for Donald Trump after old footage of Trump making lewd comments about women recently surfaced. Reno Public Radio’s Michelle Billman reports.

Catherine Cortez Masto Campaign

A  University of Nevada, Reno professor says his comments were presented out of context in a political ad criticizing Democratic U.S. Senate candidate Catherine Cortez Masto. Our News Director Michelle Billman reports.

On Campaign Trail, Heck Talks Issues, Not Trump

Aug 21, 2016
Julia Ritchey

The race for Nevada's U.S. Senate seat between Representative Joe Heck and former Attorney General Catherine Cortez Masto is intensifying. Reno Public Radio's Julia Ritchey caught up with Heck over the weekend during a campaign stop in Gardnerville. 

  Heck says he's not worried about his Democratic opponent's attempts to tether him to Donald Trump. He thinks Nevadans are more worried about state and local issues.

"They're not questioning me about what the presidential race is, they want to know what I'm going to be able to do for them here in Nevada," said Heck. 

Julia Ritchey

The Nevada primary wrapped up last night and several key races have been narrowed down. To breakdown the results, Reno Public Radio's Julia Ritchey joined Reno Gazette-Journal political reporter Seth Richardson in the studio. Listen to their conversation.

Embedded is a list of unofficial final results from Washoe County.

Three term Congressman Joe Heck handily won the Republican primary for Nevada's open U.S. Senate seat. 

Heck now faces Democratic challenger Catherine Cortez Masto in the general election to replace retiring Sen. Harry Reid.

Both candidates easily won their primary races, clinching large victories less than an hour after polls closed. Heck says he's ready to pivot to November.

campaign websites

Nine people are competing in the Republican primary for Nevada's open U.S. senate seat, vacated by retiring Senator Harry Reid. Congressman Joe Heck is largely expected to win the primary on June 14, but not without first facing a challenge from notorious Tea Party figure Sharron Angle.

Reno Public Radio's Julia Ritchey spoke with Steve Sebelius, veteran political columnist at the Las Vegas Review-Journal, on the unexpected match-up in an already unusual election cycle.

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