Nevada legislature

Round Mountain mine in Nye County, Nevada.
Uncle Kick-Kick, licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

Any one of three joint resolutions passed during the recent special session of the Nevada Legislature could ultimately change the way and rate at which mines are taxed in Nevada, and rural counties and mining companies are worried. As a warning, this story contains language that some readers may find offensive.

Teresa Benitez-Thompson and Robin Titus are standing in an auditorium. They are looking at printed documents together.
David Calvert / The Nevada Independent

The 32nd Special Session of the Nevada Legislature is over. Lawmakers adjourned sine die early Thursday morning after spending a week passing several resolutions and pieces of legislation meant to address a litany of policy issues. Noah Glick spoke with KUNR’s Paul Boger and Lucia Starbuck, who were in Carson City and covered the session in its entirety.

KUNR

The 32nd Special Session of the Nevada Legislature adjourned sine die early Thursday, August 6, after lawmakers spent a week passing several resolutions and pieces of legislation addressing policy issues.

A man holds a sign that says, "Blue Lives Matter."
David Calvert / Nevada Independent

Lawmakers in Nevada are rolling back protections granted to law enforcement officers under investigation. The protections were just put into place last year. Law enforcement agencies and progressive groups both denounced the bill. 

A sign on the ground that says, "Ban Chokeholds," covered in spotted shade from a tree.
Ty C. O’Neil / This Is Reno / Nevada News

Black Lives Matter protests have erupted across the country, and in Nevada, and with them, demands for police reform. In response, lawmakers in Nevada have approved a bill meant to change how law enforcement officers in the state handle arrests, but activists say there’s more to be done.

The exterior of the Nevada State Legislature building, surrounded by leafy green and orange trees.
David Calvert / The Nevada Independent

Lawmakers have spent the three days in Carson City debating a host of issues as part of the 32nd Special Session of the Nevada Legislature. KUNR News Director Michelle Billman spoke with Senior Reporter Paul Boger to help break it all down.

An auditorium with lawmakers sitting at desks and chairs, facing toward the front of the room. A projector is set up toward the corner of the room.
David Calvert / The Nevada Independent

Voters in Nevada will likely have the option of, once again, voting by mail in this upcoming general election. That’s after lawmakers approved a measure requiring election officials to send a ballot to all active voters during times of emergency.

KUNR

For updates on the 32nd Special Session of the Nevada Legislature, visit our live blog.

Governor Steve Sisolak has called for the 32nd Special Session of the Nevada Legislature to begin on Friday, July 31 at 9 a.m.   

Two rows of long, curved tables with people in professional attire, wearing masks, sitting in front of them. The point of view is from above and to the side.
David Calvert / Nevada Independent

Lawmakers in Nevada ended their special session to address the state's massive budget shortfall over the weekend, passing just five bills in 12 days. To help us break down that legislation, and what it means for the state, we turn now to KUNR's Paul Boger and Lucia Starbuck, who covered the session in its entirety.

KUNR

3:19 p.m. | July 20, 2020

Lawmakers Approve Hundreds Of Millions In Cuts To Address Massive Budget Hole
By Paul Boger

After 12 days of budget presentations, partisan debate, and emotional pleas from residents, lawmakers in Nevada finally ended the 31st Special Session late Sunday evening.

As part of their final act, lawmakers approved a massive budget bill known as AB3. The omnibus bill formally reduces the state budget of nearly every state agency.

Assembly Speaker Jason Frierson and Senate Majority Leader Nicole Cannizzaro at the Legislature on the twelfth day of the 31st Special Session in Carson City on Sunday, July 19, 2020.
David Calvert/Nevada Independent

Lawmakers in Nevada have officially slashed hundreds of millions of dollars from the state budget, closing a massive budget shortfall. KUNR’s Paul Boger has been reporting from the legislature and has this story.

KUNR

Nevada Governor Steve Sisolak issued the formal proclamation to call the Nevada Legislature into a special session beginning on Wednesday, July 8 at 9 a.m. to address the historic budget shortfall. This is the 31st Special Session in Nevada’s history.

People hold signs protesting proposed cuts to education funding outside the Nevada Legislature on July 8, 2020.
David Calvert / The Nevada Independent

Lawmakers in Nevada are set to cut more than a billion dollars from the state’s general fund in order to cover a budget shortfall created by the state’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Specifically, proposed cuts to the state’s public education system are causing some consternation.

Video Stream: Nevada 31st Special Session

Jul 8, 2020
Alexa Ard / KUNR Public Radio

Nevada Governor Steve Sisolak issued the formal proclamation to call the Nevada Legislature into a special session beginning on Wednesday, July 8 at 9 a.m. to address the historic budget shortfall. This is the 31st Special Session in Nevada’s history.

Governor Steve Sisolak sits at a podium at the state legislature.
Lucia Starbuck / This Is Reno

Lawmakers in Nevada are slated to gavel into a special session Wednesday morning to address a looming budget crisis. According to a report released by the Governor’s Office, Nevada is looking at a $1.2 billion deficit in the state’s general fund. 

A man wearing a suit is speaking at a podium.
Nevada Attorney General's Office

Monday marks two weeks since 46-year-old George Floyd was killed while in police custody in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Former police officer Derek Chauvin knelt on Floyd’s neck for nearly nine minutes. Floyd was pronounced dead shortly afterward.

The Nevada Legislative building
Alexa Ard / KUNR Public Radio

Nevada is facing a budget crisis. According to estimates, sales and gaming taxes fell drastically during the state’s COVID-19 related shutdown in March and April, leaving a gaping budget hole for the current fiscal year ending June 30. So, how are lawmakers and others addressing the issue?

Screenshot of Nevada lawmakers meeting virtually for the first time.
Screenshot / Nevada Legislative Counsel Bureau

Nevada lawmakers have approved a plan to spend $8.2 million in state money to address the COVID-19 pandemic.

A checkboard pattern of public land occurs along the I-80 corridor in Nevada, dating back to the U.S. Government's decision to subsidize construction of railroads by giving companies land in this pattern.
onX

Millions of acres of public land throughout our region are inaccessible to the public. A new law in Nevada is trying to fix that.

Two Democratic NV Lawmakers Bow Out Of 2018 Race

Dec 1, 2017
Nevada Legislative Building
Alexa Ard

Reno assemblywoman Amber Joiner, a Democrat, is choosing not to run for reelection in 2018. Joiner was appointed to her seat in Assembly District 24 in 2014, and since then has served for two regular sessions and two special sessions.

 

 

But in an email to The Nevada Independent, Joiner says the financial burden of campaigning and serving is unsustainable.

 

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