Nevada legislature | KUNR

Nevada legislature

Two disposable, blue face masks are placed on top of each other.
Tierney / Adobe Stock

Here are the local news headlines for the morning of Monday, Sept. 13, 2021.

Members of the Nevada Assembly are all standing and facing the center of a conference room.
Paul Boger / KUNR

The 81st Session of the Nevada Legislature is officially over after lawmakers approved one of the largest ever tax increases on the state's mining industry. The move is expected to generate millions in state revenue for education. To explain the change, KUNR Morning Edition host Noah Glick spoke with political editor Paul Boger.

The Nevada Assembly gavels out.
Paul Boger / KUNR Public Radio

Nevada lawmakers have successfully negotiated one of the largest mining tax increases in state history. The bill’s passage caps off a tumultuous session in which lawmakers added nearly hundreds of millions of dollars in new funding for schools. KUNR’s Paul Boger reports.

Two people walk past a wall of framed photos in the Nevada Legislature.
David Calvert / The Nevada Independent

There are only four days left in Nevada's 81st legislative session, and lawmakers are scrambling to get bills out of the door and onto the governor's desk. That includes appropriating billions in state dollars to fund the government over the next two years. To talk about that, KUNR Morning Edition host Noah Glick spoke with political editor Paul Boger.

Multiple people are sitting in a semicircle-shaped auditorium. There is a podium at the front of the room.
David Calvert / The Nevada Independent

Portions of Nevada’s economy have recovered faster than previously predicted, and lawmakers are using that to their advantage. This week, the legislature’s two finance committees took steps to finalize the budget. The effort includes a new education funding formula and an additional $500 million for the state’s K-12 education system. To help explain what that means for students, KUNR host Michele Ravera spoke with political editor Paul Boger.

Two people are walking next to each other through a doorway.
David Calvert / The Nevada Independent

There’s little more than a month until the 81st Session of the Nevada Legislature comes to an end, and lawmakers are still considering hundreds of bills. KUNR Morning Edition host Noah Glick spoke with political editor Paul Boger about how the week played out in Carson City.

The exterior of the Nevada State Legislative Building in Carson City.
Alexa Ard / KUNR

The COVID-19 pandemic has fundamentally changed almost every aspect of daily life. Nowhere might that be more apparent than in the classroom. Nearly half a million K-12 students in Nevada have endured months of learning remotely or through hybrid instruction showing up to school every other day. Experts predict that when students do return to school, they will have forgotten many of the things they've learned over the last year. That's why lawmakers are considering a number of bills meant to address those issues. To talk about that and more, KUNR's Morning Edition Host Noah Glick spoke with Political Reporter Paul Boger.

A stack of legislative bills being placed in cubbies.
David Calvert / The Nevada Independent

With less than six weeks until the end of the 2021 legislative session, the general public can, once again, enter the Legislative Building in Carson City, albeit, with some hoops. KUNR's Political Editor, Paul Boger spoke with Morning Edition host Noah Glick about the latest from the Capital City.

A screen capture of a Zoom call with 16 attendees.
Paul Boger / KUNR Public Radio

Nevada lawmakers have less than two months until they're forced to wrap up the 2021 session, and they still have a lot of work left to do. For the past week, legislators have cloistered in their offices, holding marathon committee hearings on hundreds of bills. To help us make sense of it all, KUNR’s Morning Edition Host Noah Glick spoke with Political Editor, Paul Boger.

Two men speak to each other from across a desk.
David Calvert / The Nevada Independent

This week officially marked the halfway point of Nevada’s 81st Legislative Session. And with less than 60 days until lawmakers are forced to end the session, they’re beginning to turn their attention to some of the most controversial bills of the year. That includes abolishing the death penalty and reforming the state’s election laws. Joining us now to talk about those measures is KUNR’s Political Editor Paul Boger.

The front entrance of the Nevada Legislature.
David Calvert / The Nevada Independent

Nevada lawmakers gave themselves a little breathing room this week, delaying the first major deadline of the 2021 legislative session. But even though they'll have more time to introduce bills, pacing in the legislature still feels sluggish. KUNR’s Morning Edition host Noah Glick spoke with political editor Paul Boger to get the latest from Carson City.

Two stacks of paper booklets on a desk.
David Calvert / The Nevada Independent

Week six of the 2021 Nevada Legislature has come and gone, leaving lawmakers with the first major deadline of the session. KUNR’s political editor Paul Boger spoke with Morning Edition host Noah Glick to share what that means.

Assemblyman Howard Watts is wearing a suit and face mask. He is writing on a paper pad while standing in the Assembly Chamber.
David Calvert / The Nevada Independent

Here are your local news headlines for the morning of Wednesday, Mar. 10, 2021.

Two women look at paperwork while standing over a desk.
David Calvert / The Nevada Independent

One month down, three to go as lawmakers in Nevada move through the 81st regular session. So far, the start of the session has been slow, but a number of large, highly anticipated pieces of legislation are set to be introduced any day now, including the measure that would create innovation zones, which would let tech companies create their own governments in undeveloped areas. KUNR’s Paul Boger spoke with Morning Edition Host Noah Glick to break down the latest.

Nevada Legislators sit masked in tiered seating.
David Calvert / The Nevada Independent

Election reform is shaping up to become the signature issue of Nevada's 81st legislative session. Among the measures up for consideration is a Republican bill that would gut the state's emergency mail-in voting law, among other changes. Democrats, on the other hand, say they're looking to make those mail-in ballots permanent. KUNR’s Noah Glick spoke with Political Editor Paul Boger about the latest from Carson City.

Front exterior of the Nevada State Legislature building.
Paul Boger / KUNR Public Radio

Over the past several years, misinformation and propaganda have taken over social media, creating confusion and division. That’s why Republican Assemblywoman Jill Tolles is introducing a measure aimed at promoting information literacy in public schools. KUNR’s Paul Boger spoke with Tolles to learn more about her bill.

Assembly Republicans standing in front of the Nevada legislative building. Some are holding signs listing priority points while Dr. Robin Titus is speaking to reporters.
Paul Boger / KUNR Public Radio

They may be in the minority, but Republicans in the Nevada legislature have set an agenda that includes bolstering the economy and reopening the state's schools. They also want to enact what they're calling common sense election reform. KUNR political editor Paul Boger joined Morning Edition host Noah Glick to break down the latest developments in Carson City.

A sign directing to a COVID-19 testing area.
David Calvert / The Nevada Independent

Normally, a new legislative session is cause for celebration. Families and spouses crowd the floors as they watch their lawmaker take the oath of office. Halls are filled with the excited buzz of lawmakers, lobbyists, press and members of the public chatting and catching up. But this year, Nevada's 81st Legislative Session has moved mostly online. That's raised questions about transparency. KUNR's Paul Boger has this report.

An individual walks down a hallway.
David Calvert / The Nevada Independent

Week One of Nevada's 81st legislative session is in the books. And while it may be off to a slow start, lawmakers are digging into bills. KUNR Morning Edition host Noah Glick checked in with political editor Paul Boger for an update from Carson City.

Tax revenues in Nevada have declined during the pandemic, which may soon force lawmakers to make some tough decisions in the months ahead, such as possibly making cuts to state services or even raising taxes. To get a sense of how this legislative session may impact the state’s business community, KUNR’s Paul Boger spoke with Ann Silver, who runs the Reno-Sparks Chamber of Commerce.

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