Green monopoly houses sit in a row against a stark, white background.
woodleywonderworks / Flickr Creative Commons

How Nevada's Eviction Moratorium Works

Like the rest of the country, Nevada is seeing a record-breaking spike in unemployment claims. In response, Governor Steve Sisolak placed a moratorium on evictions during the COVID-19 pandemic. KUNR’s Paul Boger reached out to Rita Greggio, a lawyer with Washoe Legal Services, a nonprofit legal aid organization, to talk about what the governor’s directive means.

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An illustration of an ultrastructural morphology exhibited by coronaviruses.
Alissa Eckert, MS; Dan Higgins, MAMS / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Novel Coronavirus In Nevada: Live Blog

An image of a hospital tower run by Intermountain Healthcare.
Andy D. / Flickr Creative Commons

As hospitals continue to fill up with COVID-19 patients, one major health care provider in the Mountain West announced it’s cutting pay for some of its medical staff.

Updated at 7:37 p.m. ET

The government has gone to work disbursing the billions of dollars Washington has committed to sustain the economy after the deep shock it has undergone in the pandemic, the White House promised on Thursday.

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and Jovita Carranza, head of the Small Business Administration, vowed that some of the first systems for loans or payments would be up and running as soon as Friday.

The federal government on Thursday relaxed restrictions on receiving blood donations from gay men and other groups as the country confronts a severe drop in the U.S. blood supply that officials described as urgent and unprecedented.

Durmick said, "The census is going to possibly create over $67 billion in funding for the state … which will go for things like public health and education and infrastructure, which the state is definitely going to need after the COVID-19 pandemic."
Crystal Willis / KUNR Public Radio

Sixty-seven billion dollars. That’s the amount of federal money census officials say Nevada stands to gain over the next decade. But with the current COVID-19 pandemic disrupting nearly every aspect of daily life, how are census takers ensuring an accurate count? KUNR’s Paul Boger spoke with Kerry Durmick, statewide census coordinator for Nevada Census 2020, to get an update.

El Strip de Las Vegas por la noche vacío frente al Caesars Palace Hotel y Casino.
Andrew Mendez / KUNR

Después del cierre de los negocios no esenciales en Nevada durante 30 días, muchos trabajadores de casinos se quedan sin trabajo. 

Darling Parelta trabajaba como un portera de casino en el Sahara Hotel y Casino ubicado en el famoso Strip de Las Vegas. 

Según el Associated Press, el cierre afecta a más de 200 mil empleados de casinos de Nevada. Parelta es una de ellas.

 

Ella dice que el cierre da miedo y que solo puede pensar en sus hijos.    

Updated at 10:38 a.m. ET

The number of new people claiming unemployment benefits totaled a staggering 6.648 million last week — doubling the record set a week earlier, the Labor Department said Thursday.

In the prior week, ending March 21, a revised 3.307 million initial claims were filed.

In just two weeks, nearly all of the jobs gained in the last five years have been lost.

With government authorities warning an anxious public about scams related to the coronavirus, a California company is facing scrutiny by members of Congress and the city attorney of Los Angeles for selling COVID-19 test kits that it claimed can be used "in the home or at the bedside."

Neilly Buckalew is a traveling doctor who fills in at hospitals when there's need. So in the midst of this pandemic, she feels particularly vulnerable to contracting the coronavirus — not just in hospitals but in hotels and on her travels.

Not all Americans can stay home during the pandemic.

Millions of essential workers are showing up for their jobs at warehouses, food processing plants, delivery trucks and grocery checkout lines. Work that is often low-paid, and comes with few protections, is now suddenly much more dangerous.

America has a new appreciation for these workers. Bill Osborn, a dairy clerk at a Giant in La Plata, Md., says he never used to be thanked for his job. Ever.

But now that has changed.

Ellis Marsalis, jazz pianist, educator, and patriarch of the Marsalis family, has died at the age of 85. His death was announced in tweets from New Orleans Mayor LaToya Cantrell and Jazz at Lincoln Center, where his son Wynton is managing and artistic director.

He reportedly went into the hospital over the weekend with symptoms of pneumonia. The New York Times reports that his son Branford says the cause of death was complications from COVID-19.

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